Parenting
11:40 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Should Toddlers Own Tablets?

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:57 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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Education
11:40 am
Tue April 2, 2013

For Women, No Straight Road To Success

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:57 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, it is April, which means, along with April showers, National Poetry Month and we will be asking you once again to contribute if you would like by tweeting us your original poems in 140 characters or less. We are going to kick it off with our curator Holly Bass in just a minute.

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Around the Nation
7:05 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Surprise Party Kidnapping Lands Friends In Hot Water

Friends of a New York man planned a surprise party, but he found out. To surprise him, they threw a pillowcase over his head, threw him in a van and drove him to the party in Pennsylvania. Witnesses to the fake abduction called police, who mounted a massive search.

Around the Nation
6:58 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Mets Opening Day Special For Fan, Usher

In 1964, Robert Ostertag attended his first of 50 straight New York Mets home openers. That same day, Luke Gasparre began his job as an usher. The New York Times captured quite a moment Monday: Gasparre showed Ostertag to his seat in section 310.

6:37 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Part-time parking employees to replace contract workers in Kalamazoo

Lead in text: 
The Kalamazoo city commission voted last night to let the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety hire three new part-time employees. By not renewing their contract with AMPCO System Parking, Kalamazoo Police Chief Jeff Hadley says the city will save about $200,000.
Commissioners approved in a 6-0 vote the plan that would allow the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety to hire three non-union civilians for the jobs instead of renewing a contract with AMPCO System Parking. Hiring in-house instead of renewing the $316,000 contract would save the city about $200,000, KDPS Chief Jeff Hadley has said.
6:33 am
Tue April 2, 2013

State police force increases

Lead in text: 
The Michigan State Police swore in 90 new troopers on Friday.
Michigan has 90 new state police troopers. The troopers were sworn in Friday in Lansing. The new troopers join a Michigan State Police force that is at its lowest staffing levels since the 1960's. Governor Rick Snyder promised the new troopers that will change.
6:29 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Parasites threaten Great Lakes says Wisconsin senator

Lead in text: 
A Wisconsin senator wants to keep eel-like parasites called sea lamprey out of the Great Lakes.
A bill circulated by a Republican lawmaker aims to control sea lamprey - eel-like parasites that look like monsters, attack trout and other fish, and could suck the lifeblood out of the Great Lakes ecosystem. The toothy invasive species threatens the commercial and recreational fisheries and tourism industry, said the bill's sponsor, Sen.
Sports
5:18 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Baseball Begins In The Shadow Of March Madness

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, let's take a break from all the March Madness in college basketball for a few minutes and talk about the beginning of the long and winding Major League Baseball season. Yesterday was opening day for several teams. We thought we'd tick off a couple of notable games and see if the very early results match up to preseason predictions. Or maybe they won't. Here to give us some guidance NPR's sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Morning, Tom.

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Around the Nation
5:18 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Budgets Cuts Force Some Air Traffic Control Towers To Close

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 5:31 am

David Greene talks to Yvette Aehle, director of the Southwest Georgia Regional Airport, about her plans to shut down the airport's air traffic control tower. Because of sequestration, the FAA will no longer pay for air traffic controllers at 144 smaller airports.

Around the Nation
5:18 am
Tue April 2, 2013

April Fools' Day Pranks Revealed

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 6:33 am

If it was a sleepy Monday for you, you may have fallen victim to some April Fools' Day pranks. David Greene and Steve Inskeep have a roundup of some of the all-in-fun pranks.

Afghanistan
3:27 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Afghanistan, Pakistan Struggle To Find Common Ground

Afghanistan presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi speaks during a news conference in Kabul, Afghanistan, earlier this year.
Ahmad Nazar AP

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:05 am

Much has changed since last November, when Afghans were praising Pakistan for saying it would no longer support the Taliban and would instead work for peace.

"We believe that relations between the two countries are deteriorating," says Aimal Faizi, spokesman for President Hamid Karzai.

Faizi says the downward slide started last month. The two countries had agreed to convene a conference of religious scholars, or ulema, to denounce suicide bombing. But the conference fell apart at the last minute, with each country blaming the other for undermining the effort.

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It's All Politics
3:25 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Judicial Vacancies Languish On Key Federal Appeals Court

President Obama last month withdrew the nomination of Caitlin J. Halligan to the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., after her nomination was blocked by Senate Republicans.
Jim McKnight AP

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 7:42 am

The federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., is sometimes called the second most important court in the country, regularly delivering the final word on major environmental, labor and national security cases.

But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has a whopping four vacancies, the most in the nation, including one opening that dates all the way back to 2005, when John Roberts moved to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:24 am
Tue April 2, 2013

When You're Mixed Race, Just One Box Is Not Enough

Dave Kung with wife Sarah Tyson (left), stepson Cy Tyson-Brown and parents Sonja and George Kung.
Courtesy of Dave Kung

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:49 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

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Theater
5:50 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Nora Ephron's 'Lucky Guy' And Tom Hanks Make Their Broadway Debuts

Nora Ephron's final play, Lucky Guy, tells the story of controversial New York columnist Mike McAlary, played by Tom Hanks. (Also pictured: Peter Gerety as John Cotter).
Boneau / Bryan-Brown

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:57 pm

Several years ago, when Nora Ephron handed Tom Hanks an early draft of Lucky Guy, her play about tabloid journalist Mike McAlary, he had a pretty strong reaction.

"I said, 'Well, that guy's sure a jerk!' I used another word besides jerk — I know what you can say on NPR," he says. "And she laughed and she said, 'Well, he kinda was. But he was kinda great, too.'"

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Religion
5:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

With New Pope, Catholic Women Hope To Regain Church Leadership Roles

Parishioners partake in the Way Of The Cross procession at the Colosseum on Good Friday in Rome. A group of women Catholics recently made a pilgrimage to Rome to request that women once again be allowed to hold leadership positions in the church.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:45 pm

The newly elected pope's focus on the poor and the marginalized has instilled great faith among many Catholic women. They hope the papacy of Pope Francis will promote a leading role for women in the church.

A group of American nuns and Catholic women recently made a pilgrimage to Rome to make their requests heard.

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It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Opposition Research Boot Camp: Learning To Dig For Political Dirt

Opposition research is becoming a given in politics, sometimes even at the local level.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 8:29 pm

Opposition research exists mostly in the political shadows. So perhaps it's fitting that this boot camp is in an generic conference room in a generic airport hotel outside of Washington, D.C.

It's run by private investigator Larry Zilliox, who specializes in opposition research. He allowed me to attend a session, but not to take pictures.

Zilliox is cagey about his clients: "As a general rule, it suits me best not to comment on who I've worked for. Everybody is better off that way."

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Shots - Health News
3:41 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

When anthropologists tallied the use of emotional words through a century of literature, they included many books without clear emotional content — technical manuals, for example, and automotive repair guides.
Steve Debenport iStockphotography

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:18 am

Were people happier in the 1950s than they are today? Or were they more frustrated, repressed and sad?

To find out, you'd have to compare the emotions of one generation to another. British anthropologists think they may have found the answer — embedded in literature.

Several years ago, more or less on a lark, a group of researchers from England used a computer program to analyze the emotional content of books from every year of the 20th century — close to a billion words in millions of books.

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Politics
2:27 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

The Politics Of The Guest-Worker Program

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO agreed on a plan for a new system to import temporary workers. NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving discusses the politics of the business-labor immigration deal. Rusty Barr, owner of Barr Evergreens, shares how he uses the guest-worker program.

Opinion
2:18 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Op-Ed: The Iraq War's Lessons For Syria

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now Syria and Iraq on the Opinion Page this week. As we reconsider the 10 years since the invasion of Iraq, Washington Post editor Jackson Diehl says we should learn from that costly experience as we consider the civil war in Syria. About absent U.S. intervention, he argues, Syria could produce a much worse humanitarian disaster than Iraq. The tragedy of the post-Iraq logic embraced by President Obama, writes Diehl, is that it has ruled out not just George W. Bush-style invasions, but also more modest interventions.

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Sports
2:00 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

How Coaches Get Teams Through Rough Spots

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:02 pm

In Sunday night's NCAA men's basketball tournament, Louisville guard Kevin Ware suffered a gruesome injury. Coach Rick Pitino rallied the team and led them to a victory over Duke. When accidents like this happen, coaches are tasked with rallying team members and keeping them focused.

Author Interviews
1:54 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

In Digestion: Mary Roach Explains What Happens To The Food We Eat

iStockphoto.com

For all our talk about food, we don't like to think much about it after we put it in our mouths. But Mary Roach — whose latest book is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal — did just that. Gulp takes a close look at the human digestive system, from the mouth on down, and Roach writes that she wants readers to say not, "This is gross," but instead, "I thought this would be gross, but it's really interesting. OK, and maybe a little gross."

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Remembrances
1:54 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Listening Back To An Interview With Phil Ramone

Phil Ramone in New York in 1997.
Ken Weingart Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:15 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. We're going to remember the record producer and engineer Phil Ramone who died Saturday at the age of 79. He won 14 Grammys. He started his career as an engineer, recording singers like Lesley Gore, Dusty Springfield and Dionne Warwick. He went on to produce recordings by Paul Simon, Billy Joel, Barbara Streisand, Ray Charles and Tony Bennett as well as the original cast recording of Stephen Sondheim's "Passion."

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WMUK News
1:42 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

EPA Allied Paper landfill plan faces opposition

Warning signs outside the Allied Paper landfill
Credit WMUK

City officials, environmentalists, and many residents aren’t happy about a federal proposal for Kalamazoo’s Allied Paper landfill. In March, officials from the Environmental Protection Agency briefed city commissioners on a proposal to leave highly toxic PCB contamination at the Superfund site. The city and the Kalamazoo River Cleanup Coalition want all of the material removed.

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Author Interviews
12:33 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Newark Doctor Aims To Be Education's 'Michael Jordan'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, cable television has become a staple of our daily lives, of course, and if you live in parts of south central Los Angeles, you might have the Galloway brothers to thank for your daily dose of news, sports and entertainment. We'll talk with Clinton Galloway about how his fight to bring cable to underserved communities took him from city hall to the Supreme Court. That's in just a few minutes.

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Education
12:33 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Tensions Build In Detroit After Schools Takeover

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we'll turn from New Jersey to Detroit, where tensions are really building around the public school system there. The U.S. Department of Education is looking into whether recent school closures have disproportionately hurt black and Latino students. Also, an emergency financial manager is shaking things up at Detroit Public Schools after getting some new authority from the state.

Here to explain is Jerome Vaughn, news director at member station WDET in Detroit. Welcome back, Jerome.

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Education
12:33 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Struggling Schools Targeted For Takeovers

Many political leaders say the solution for failing school systems is a takeover. But can mayors, governors or other government leaders actually fix broken schools? Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the expectations and consequences of school takeovers with Emily Richmond of the National Education Writers Association.

Culture & Music
11:33 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Indian improvised music still fresh at more than 2,000 years old

Prapancham Sitaram
Credit The Hindu

Kalamazoo College student Kiran Vangipuram started drumming on the mridangam after he saw an Indian Carnatic concert when he was little. What drew that 8-year-old to a roughly 2,000 year old art form? The crazy fast beats of course.

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8:09 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Coalition seeks the end of the Grand Rapids "S-Curve"

Lead in text: 
Supporters of the proposal to straighten US 131 in downtown Grand Rapids admit that it would take at least a decade to accomplish.
The elevated strip of U.S. 131 and its signature S-Curve could disappear from the downtown Grand Rapids map. That's the vision of a loose-knit coalition of local professionals, whose members believe the elevated highway stands in the way of future growth in the city's urban core.
Read More: http://mibiz.com
WMUK News
8:02 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Pro baseball may return to Kalamazoo

Battle Creek Bombers game in 2011
Credit Battle Creek Bombers

The smell of roasted peanuts, sizzling brats grilling, and the sounds of baseball could be coming back to Kalamazoo. There won’t be professional baseball in the city this season. But a new chapter in Kalamazoo’s baseball history could begin in 2014.

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7:37 am
Mon April 1, 2013

FBI says "no thanks" to BC police probe request

Lead in text: 
The state Attorney General's Office and MIchigan State Police officials have also declined requests to look into the issue.
The FBI isn't ready to investigate the Battle Creek Police Department, the city said Saturday. Following allegations by a city commissioner of poor management and illegal activities, Police Chief Jackie Hampton said Thursday he requested an investigation by the FBI of the department. But City Manager Ken Tsuchiyama confirmed Saturday that that agency has declined the request.

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