Remembrances
2:03 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Remembering Journalist Anthony Lewis

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 2:28 pm

Anthony Lewis, former reporter and columnist for The New York Times, died Monday at the age of 85. NPR's Neal Conan remembers the Pulitzer Prize winner, and listens back to a conversation with Lewis about his career and the stories he covered, just after his retirement in 2002.

Law
2:03 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

A Recap Of Proposition 8's Day At The Supreme Court

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 2:22 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. It's day one in the debate over same-sex marriage at the Supreme Court. This morning the court heard arguments on California's ban on same-sex marriage, which was approved by voters in a ballot measure called Proposition 8. Tomorrow they'll hear a constitutional challenge to the Defense of Marriage Act.

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1:58 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Grand jury on meningitis outbreak sought

Lead in text: 
The case involves injection steroids sent to four facilities in Michigan from a Massachusetts company.
LANSING - Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette wants to empanel a grand jury to investigate the recent meningitis outbreak -- allegedly caused by a contaminated steroid -- that has been blamed for 259 cases of meningitis and 14 deaths in the state.
Author Interviews
1:33 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

'Angry Days' Shows An America Torn Over Entering World War II

Before Pearl Harbor, aviator Charles Lindbergh was so vocal about his opposition to U.S. involvement in World War II that he became an unofficial leader of America's isolationist movement.
AP

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 3:30 pm

During the debate over whether to invade Iraq, or whether to stay in Afghanistan, many people looked back to World War II, describing it as a good and just war — a war the U.S. knew it had to fight. In reality, it wasn't that simple. When Britain and France went to war with Germany in 1939, Americans were divided about offering military aid, and the debate over the U.S. joining the war was even more heated. It wasn't until two years later, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and Germany declared war against the U.S., that Americans officially entered the conflict.

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Remembrances
1:32 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Fresh Air Remembers Journalist Anthony Lewis

Anthony Lewis, the New York Times columnist and reporter who covered the Supreme Court in the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Monday. Fresh Air remembers him by listening back to a 1991 interview in which Lewis talks about the responsibilities of a columnist and the importance of a correctly-spelled name.

Howard Berkes is a correspondent for the NPR Investigations Unit.

Buried In Grain
12:41 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Fines Slashed In Grain Bin Entrapment Deaths

Friends and classmates of Wyatt Whitebread, Alex Pacas and Will Piper watch as rescuers work to free the boys from the bin (center) full of thousands of bushels of corn. Only Piper survived.
Alex T. Paschal AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 5:58 pm

The night before he died, Wyatt Whitebread couldn't stand the thought of going back to the grain bins on the edge of Mount Carroll, Ill.

The mischievous and popular 14-year-old had been excited about his first real job, he told Lisa Jones, the mother of some of his closest friends, as she drove him home from a night out for pizza. But nearly two weeks later he told her he was tired of being sent into massive storage bins clogged with corn.

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Shots - Health News
12:09 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Sequencing Of HeLa Genome Revives Genetic Privacy Concerns

A micrograph of HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells taken from Henrietta Lacks.
Tomasz Szul/Visuals Unlimited, Inc. Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 1:32 pm

Last week, scientists announced they had sequenced the full genome of the most widely used human cell line in biology, the "HeLa" cells, and published the results on the web. But the descendents of the woman from whom the cells originated were never consulted before the genetic information was made public, and thus never gave their consent to its release.

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Around the Nation
12:03 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

How Will America Cope With Diversity Changes?

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We want to continue our conversation about this country's changing population. We hope you just heard my conversation with demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institution and the University of Michigan and he told us that in just five years the majority of Americans under 18 will be members of groups that are minorities now, which is to say not white. That's a lot sooner than demographers had expected that to happen.

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Economy
11:32 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Indian Nations Squeezed By Sequester

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, when regular jobs can't be found or don't pay all the bills, many Americans turn to the so-called shadow economy, which is bigger than you might think. We'll talk about that in our conversation about personal finance just ahead. But first, we want to turn, again, to how the government is paying its bills or not. We're talking about the sequestration.

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Around the Nation
11:32 am
Tue March 26, 2013

The Browning Of A Nation

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You've probably been hearing a lot about how America's racial and ethnic makeup is changing. Now it seems as though some of these population tipping points are happening sooner than expected. In a few minutes we will talk about the implications of this in areas like the economy and pop culture.

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Europe
9:57 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Amanda Knox May Face Retrial After Italian Court Ruling

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's turn to news this morning in Italy. In a surprise ruling, Italy's highest court has ordered a retrial of American Amanda Knox. She's the former exchange student who, along with her former boyfriend, was charged in the murder of her British roommate. Today's ruling overturned the 2011 acquittal of the two defendants after they spent four years in jail.

We're joined by NPR's Sylvia Poggioli on the line from Rome. Good morning, Sylvia.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Europe
7:44 am
Tue March 26, 2013

5 People Jailed In Britain For Movie Tax Scam

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The movie "Argo" told the story of a fake film that was a cover to get hostages out of Iran. Well, think of this as the "Argo" of tax fraud. Five people have been jailed in the U.K. for orchestrating quite a tax scam. The group pretended to make a movie to secure millions in tax credits from the British Film Commission.

Around the Nation
7:40 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Hey Punxsutawney Phil! Where's Spring?

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

As snow blanketed parts of the country yesterday, many turned their anger towards a weather predictor. Last month, Punxsutawney Phil forecast an early spring. One shivering Ohio prosecutor filed a lighthearted criminal indictment against Phil for fraud. But the president of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club says it's not Phil's fault. He says he misinterpreted the groundhog's message, which has the prosecutor reconsidering charges.

6:55 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Parchment school board mum on settlement with administrator involved in drunk driving chase

Lead in text: 
School board president calls it a "personnel issue" when asked about settlement with John Thompson
PARCHMENT, MI -- Members of the Parchment School District Board of Education aren't saying why they approved a financial settlement in exchange for the resignation of John Thompson, a Parchment administrator convicted last fall in a drunken-driving case that included a 120-mph police chase.
6:39 am
Tue March 26, 2013

House Democrats propose plan to repeal pension tax

Lead in text: 
Proposals have little chance of passing Republican-controlled Legislature
LANSING -- Democrats in the state House of Representatives have big plans to ease the tax burden on middle-class families. They plan to introduce bills that will repeal the tax passed in 2011 on seniors' pension income, restore the Earned Income Tax Credit to 11%, as well as child deductions and the homestead property tax credit.
6:29 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Numbers show recovery in housing market for Southwest corner of state

Lead in text: 
Improvement found in Berrien, parts of Cass and Van Buren Counties
ST. JOSEPH - February showed a continuing recovery in the local housing market, according to Gary Walter, executive vice president of the Southwestern Michigan Association of Realtors.
6:19 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Hope College selects next president

Lead in text: 
John Knapp will begin work on July first. Current Hope President Jim Bultman is retiring after leading the college for 14 years
On Monday, John C. Knapp, founding director of the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala., was chosen to be Hope College's next president.
6:13 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Men's basketball: Western Michigan wins to advance to semi-finals of College Basketball Invitational

Lead in text: 
Broncos win 75-67 in overtime at Wyoming. Western will play at George Mason on Wednesday
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Western Michigan University basketball players found it difficult to breathe in the 7,220-foot altitude Monday night in Laramie, Wyo. At times, the Broncos also found it tough to shoot, defend, execute the game plan - you name it - during their College Basketball Invitational quarterfinals game at Wyoming.
NPR Story
5:33 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Abortion Opponents Gear Up For More Battles

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now to a debate over abortion that has escalated after some recent moves by states. The North Dakota legislature just passed a series of bills, including the strictest abortion ban in the country. And lawmakers there voted to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot next year which would end abortion entirely. Earlier this month, Arkansas passed a 12-week ban. NPR's Kathy Lohr reports that more states are debating stricter laws with hopes of getting one of them before the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Business
5:33 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Ford Unit Apologizes For Demeaning Ads

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And out next business story fits in the category of what were they thinking? Ford Motor Company is apologizing for ads sketched up by an agency in India - ads that have been decried as demeaning to women. They are cartoon drawings showing off how spacious a Ford trunk can be. One spoofs Italy's former prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi. He's at the wheel, and in the trunk, three women, tied up.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

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Business
5:02 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Opposition Blocks Return-Free Tax Filing In U.S.

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Imagine a world with no tax returns.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: OK, it's just a fantasy. But actually, in some countries taxpayers can sign up to receive simply a bill. The government sends you a tax bill, you pay it and, voila, that's it.

Now, there was an effort to bring return-free filing to the United States, but that effort came up against stiff opposition. And to find out why, we called Liz Day of ProPublica. She's been digging into this issue.

Liz, thanks for joining us.

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Shots - Health News
3:28 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Maybe Isolation, Not Loneliness, Shortens Life

People who are socially isolated may be at a greater risk of dying sooner, a British study suggests. But do Facebook friends count? How about texting?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 11:54 am

Loneliness hurts, but social isolation can kill you. That's the conclusion of a study of more than 6,500 people in the U.K.

The study, by a team at University College London, comes after decades of research showing that both loneliness and infrequent contact with friends and family can, independently, shorten a person's life. The scientists expected to find that the combination of these two risk factors would be especially dangerous.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Arkansas Medicaid Expansion Attracts Other States' Interest

Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe speaks at a rally promoting the expansion of Medicaid in the state in front of the Capitol in Little Rock on March 7.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Since the Supreme Court made the Medicaid expansion under the federal health law optional last year, states' decisions have largely split along party lines. States run by Democrats have been opting in; states run by Republicans have mostly been saying no or holding back.

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Around the Nation
3:26 am
Tue March 26, 2013

'American Winter' Families Struggle To Survive Fall From Middle Class

Pam Thatcher and her family ultimately moved into her mother's two-bedroom apartment because they couldn't make rent.
Courtesy Devon Terrilll Viewfilm productions/HBO

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

It's a visual no parent wants to picture: a child describing what it's like to live in a house with no power for lights, heat or cooking. For many middle-class American parents, it's hard to imagine their family ever facing a situation like that. But a new HBO documentary suggests that many seemingly prosperous parents are only a few misfortunes away from dark houses and empty refrigerators.

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Arts & More
11:08 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Looking for fresh food? Winter farmer's markets grow in Kalamazoo

Plants in the greenhouse at Summer Sun Nursery.
Credit Maggie Kane

Winter weather means slower growing for Michigan farmers, but it doesn’t stop them from selling their produce at outlets like indoor farmers markets. Winter’s market business doesn’t rival summer’s, but it has been growing in recent years.

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Theatre
11:05 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Local theatre wants child sexual abuse survivors to tell their stories

Denise Miller reading one of her poems at FIRE Historical and Cultural Arts Collaborative
Credit Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Laura Sprague's occupation. 

Though it’s thought to be one of the most underreported crimes, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control estimate about 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls will face sexual assault before the age of 18. On Friday night, FIRE Historical and Cultural Arts Collaborative will show a taping of the New York theatre troupe Ping Chong & Company’s production Secret Survivors, where survivors of child sexual abuse use theatre to talk about their experiences.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
7:39 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

In First Of 2 Gay-Marriage Cases, Court Turns To Proposition 8

Snow covers flowers in front of the Supreme Court building on Monday in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the justices hear oral arguments on the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8, which banned gay marriage.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 9:57 am

Outside the Supreme Court, lines began forming nearly a week ago. By Monday, the line had snaked down the court steps and to the corner, with people braving freezing temperatures and snow in anticipation of the historic arguments on same-sex marriage on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The justices are first hearing a constitutional challenge to California's ban on same-sex marriage. A second day is devoted to the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal benefits to same-sex couples married in the nine states where such unions are legal.

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Economy
7:11 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

As Cardinal, New Pope Walked Fine Line On Economic Issues

The former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio walks outside the chapel during a Mass at the Barracas neighborhood in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 2003. Bergoglio, who became Pope Francis, is said to have the same position as his predecessors on economic matters.
AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 5:59 pm

He took his name from a 13th century saint who gave up his wealth and threw in his lot with the poor. As cardinal in Argentina, he eschewed the trappings of power and privilege, taking public transportation and even cooking his own meals.

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The Salt
6:08 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Are Agriculture's Most Popular Insecticides Killing Our Bees?

Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:42 am

Environmentalists and beekeepers are calling on the government to ban some of the country's most widely used insect-killing chemicals.

The pesticides, called neonicotinoids, became popular among farmers during the 1990s. They're used to coat the seeds of many agricultural crops, including the biggest crop of all: corn. Neonics, as they're called, protect those crops from insect pests.

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