Europe
9:38 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Cyprus Proposes Exempting Smaller Deposits From Tax

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers in Cyprus are trying to ease rage over a proposed tax on all bank deposits by exempting people who have relatively small accounts. It's part of a bailout plan for that Mediterranean country negotiated with the E.U. and IMF over the weekend, but the compromise on taxes may not be enough for Cyprus' parliament to pass the plan.

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Local Music
8:31 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Composer Derek Bermel honors Bartok, NY

Derek Bermel
Credit Azzurra

The Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra's concert Friday will feature new music by American composer Derek Bermel

A native New Yorker, in 2009 he wrote A Shout, a Whisper, and a Trace to honor his hometown as well as the great expatriate Hungarian composer Bela Bartok, whose sometimes sorrowful letters from New York to his friends and students were an inspiration.

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8:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Vicksburg hires consultant to help with accounting practices

Lead in text: 
Portage man will work part-time with village on finances
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
VICKSBURG, MI - A Portage man with several years of accounting experience with area agencies and groups has been hired to straighten out the financial practices of the village of Vicksburg. Richard A. Dykstra was hired Monday by the Vicksburg Village Council as a part-time accountant and consultant.
Religion
7:52 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Installation Mass Launches Pope Francis' Papacy

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

INSKEEP: That's the sound of bells in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, as Pope Francis celebrated his inaugural Mass today. The ceremony was infused with meaning, both in the substance of what the new pope said and the symbolism of how he was presented.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Rome.

Hi, Sylvia.

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Around the Nation
7:37 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Broncos Cut Player After Missed Contract Deadline

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:34 am
Tue March 19, 2013

A Guilty Conscience Needs No Accuser

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A guilty conscience needs no accuser. The Barry County Sheriff's Department in Michigan received $1,200 in cash yesterday with an emotional letter. The writer admitted stealing $800 from a convenience store some 30 years ago; writing, quote, "I can't begin to say how sorry I am, but have lived with this guilt too long."

A noble gesture but keeping up with inflation, the robber would technically owe another $600.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Saint Joseph City Manager may leave earlier than expected

Lead in text: 
Frank Walsh had planned to leave in August, but is now in line for job managing Lansing-area township.
ST. JOSEPH - It looks like there won't be one more endless St. Joseph summer for City Manager Frank Walsh.
6:37 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Battle Creek meeting on crime numbers and police department

Lead in text: 
Commissioners and residents debate rankings which show high crime rate in Battle Creek. Discussion of police department gets heated.
For more than two hours Monday the Battle Creek City Commission and 100 residents talked about crime and the police department. "I think we got a lot of issues on the table and sometimes you have to do that," Mayor Susan Baldwin said after adjournment. "We heard different sides and concerns."
6:31 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Palisades owner says plant is safe.

Lead in text: 
Entergy Vice President says company is committed to operating plant near South Haven "at highest levels of safety and reliability."
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Entergy Corp., which owns Palisades nuclear power plant, said that the facility is "safe and secure," a day ahead of a webinar by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. "The Palisades nuclear plant is a safe and secure facility, and we have an NRC license to operate this facility through 2031," said Tony Vitale, site vice president for Palisades, in a statement.
6:16 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission approves ordinance making it illegal to enter someone else's parked car

Lead in text: 
City officials say new ordinance closes a loophole. State law makes it a crime to steal a car
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
The ordinance makes it illegal for someone to enter a parked car unless that person owns or leases the vehicle, owns or leases the property where the vehicle is located or has permission from the owner or lessee of the vehicle or of the property where the vehicle is located.
Politics
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

RNC Election Report Calls For Minority Outreach, Primary Changes

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Republican Party has issued a blistering assessment of why it lost the 2012 election. The Republican National Committee Growth and Opportunity Project told the party that if it wants to win national elections in the future, it needs to change the way it communicates with voters and runs its campaigns.

NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

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Research News
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

What Is The Effect Of Asking Americans To Think About The Greater Good?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama recently called for stricter gun control laws, he started out by saying this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This is the land of the free, and it always will be.

INSKEEP: The land of the free, he said. But he added this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

OBAMA: We don't live in isolation. We live in a society, a government of and by and for the people. We are responsible for each other.

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Business
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is filial piety.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's the ancient Chinese ethic of young people showing care and respect to their parents and older relatives. Now it's the law in China. Starting this summer, if kids don't pay enough attention to their folks, mom and dad can sue.

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Iraq
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

1 Decade Since The War, Where Iraq Stands Now

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a checkpoint decorated with plastic flowers in Baghdad in 2008.
Ali Yussef AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:00 pm

Ten years after the U.S.-led war in Iraq, NPR is looking at where the country stands now. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently visited Baghdad and offered this take on how the Iraqi capital feels today.

I think the single word that would best describe Baghdad these days is traffic. It can take hours just to get from one place to another. And I guess that's both good and bad.

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Around the Nation
3:18 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 8:35 pm

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

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Shots - Health News
3:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 7:44 am

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

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9:26 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Battle Creek considers long list of bond projects

Lead in text: 
City Manager says Battle Creek's relatively healthy budget, low cost of borrowing, make it right time for bond project
The city of Battle Creek could take on $16 million in new debt to pay for a wide range of projects around downtown, in various parks and at other sites.
9:20 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Democrat Mike O'Brien won't run for Congress again in 2014

Lead in text: 
O'Brien's former campaign manager says there won't be a rematch in 2014 after he gave Republican Fred Upton one of his closest races in 2012.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
"Mike O'Brien will not be running for Congress this cycle," said Keith Rosendahl in an email. "He has his eye on 2016." In the 2012 election, the former Marine, organic farmer and business developer won 42.7 percent of the vote in Michigan's 6th District, compared with Upton's 54.5 percent.
Culture
7:33 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Learn about the French-speaking world at the Francophone Film Fest

From the film 'The Weight of the Oath' by Kollo Daniel Sanou. Sanou will present the film in person on Saturday.
Credit The Francophone Film Festival

Try to count how many foreign films you’ve seen in your life. If you’re like most Americans, you’ve probably only watched a handful.

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U.S.
6:02 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Among Thousands Of Gun Deaths, Only One Charles Foster Jr.

Led by the Rev. Willie Phillips (center), protesters march in February against violence in and around Club Majestic.
Mike Haskey Courtesy of The Ledger Enquirer

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:45 pm

The Morris Missionary Baptist Church is nestled down a red dirt road, in Morris, Ga., set among pine trees near the Alabama state line. Next to the small white church lies its most recent grave site: that of Charles Foster Jr.

While the mass killings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., garnered a frenzy of news coverage, statistically, they are not the norm. Each year, thousands of gun homicides in the U.S. — 11,000 in 2010 alone — attract little or no media attention.

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Author Interviews
5:13 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

'FDR And The Jews' Puts A President's Compromises In Context

President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with the National Jewish Welfare Board — (left to right) Walter Rothschild, Chaplain Aryeh Lev, Barnett Brickner and Louis Kraft — at the White House on Nov. 8, 1943.
George R. Skadding AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:17 am

The subject of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's relationship with the Jewish community is complicated, multidimensional and contentious. On the one hand, the former New York governor won Jewish votes by landslide margins and led the Allies to victory in World War II, defeating Nazi Germany. Some of his closest advisers and strongest supporters were Jews, including Felix Frankfurter, whom he named to the Supreme Court, speechwriter Samuel Rosenman and Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau.

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Europe
4:37 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Confidence In Cyprus Banks Falters As Government Proposes Deposit Tax

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 5:54 pm

Cyprus is facing a run on its banks after the government proposed taxing bank deposits. The government has put off a vote on the plan in a bid to calm things down. Banks are set to re-open on Thursday after a bank holiday was declared on Monday.

Law
4:37 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Supreme Court Tests Limits Of Voter Registration Law

Arizona Attorney General Thomas Horne talks with reporters outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments in the case challenging Arizona's voter registration law on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 6:57 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case that seeks to redefine a federal law aimed at streamlining the nation's voter registration process.

Congress enacted the law 20 years ago after it found that 40 percent of eligible voters were not registered to vote. Under the 1993 National Voter Registration Act, people can register by mail to vote in federal elections using a standard federal form. The form, among other things, asks prospective voters whether they are U.S. citizens and requires them to sign to the statement, under penalty of perjury.

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Latin America
3:07 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Three Decades On, Ex-Guatemalan Leader Faces Genocide Charges

Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Tuesday, the prosecution will present its case in the trial.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:44 pm

In a Guatemalan courtroom Tuesday, prosecutors will present their case against a former military dictator who ruled during one of the bloodiest periods in the Central American nation's 36-year civil war.

Efrain Rios Montt is accused of genocide in the murder of tens of thousands of Guatemala's Indians. Human rights advocates and the families of victims have struggled for years to bring him before the court, and they say it is the first trial in Latin America of a former president in the country where he ruled.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Stalker Who Inspired 'The Natural' Dies; Lived Real Life In Obscurity

Ruth Ann Steinhagen, then-19, in the Cook County Jail after she shot Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus in 1949. On the table: a photo of Waitkus taken in the hospital where he was recovering from his bullet wound. The story of his shooting was the inspiration for Bernard Malamud's novel The Natural. Steinhagen died this past December.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 5:54 pm

  • NPR's Robert Siegel and Bob Goldsborough of the Chicago Tribune: What happened to Ruth Ann Steinhagen?
  • Bob Goldsborough on Ruth Ann Steinhagen's quiet life

Though we've seen The Natural many times, we have to confess we didn't know that a real woman shot a real baseball player in 1949 and that their story inspired Bernard Malamud's 1952 book and Robert Redford's 1984 movie.

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Iraq
2:14 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

A Decade Later, What Was Accomplished In Iraq

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:16 pm

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

Ten years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq. This is an NPR news special. I'm Tom Gjelten. Neal Conan is away. March 2003, U.S. troops sped up across the desert from Kuwait into Iraq. The goal was to topple Saddam Hussein, a brutal dictator. Resistance to the invasion was light. Within weeks, the Hussein regime had fallen.

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Opinion
2:04 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Op-Ed: College Basketball Has Lost The Madness

Longtime sports columnist Dave Kindred says college basketball has changed for the worst.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:58 pm

March Madness is officially here. Starting Tuesday, 68 college teams will compete for a spot at the NCAA men's championship on April 8. As millions across the country fill out brackets and enter office pools, this season has left longtime sports columnist Dave Kindred yearning for the good old days.

In a piece in The Washington Post, he argues that college basketball has lost its way.

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Media
2:04 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

As Consumers Jump Ship, News Outlets Shift Priorities

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:44 pm

Americans are abandoning their long-trusted news outlets in high numbers. According to a Pew Research Center report, 31 percent of Americans say they have deserted a particular news outlet because it no longer provides the information they want.

Television
1:56 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Two New TV Dramas Look Below The Surface

Elisabeth Moss (right) and Thomas Wright star in Jane Campion's new series Top of the Lake.
The Sundance Channel

Top of the Lake, a new seven-part miniseries premiering tonight on the Sundance Channel, was co-created and co-directed by Jane Campion, who teamed with Holly Hunter 20 years ago on the movie The Piano. Hunter is back for this new project, playing a mysterious New Agey guru of sorts. She's started a small commune for emotionally damaged women, on a remote strip of land in New Zealand.

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