9:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

KPS Superintendent Rice calls for state to "substantially" increase investment in children

Lead in text: 
Rice says he wants people to see spending on education and support services as a moral issue to ensure all children have an equal opportunity in life.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Kalamazoo Public Schools Superintendent Michael Rice says that Michigan needs to spend "substantially" more on K-12 education and other services that support low-income children and other youngsters with special needs. "I'm calling for a substantially larger investment in children," Rice said in a presentation to his board Thursday on educational funding.
WMU Hockey
9:25 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Western Michigan looks to defend CCHA tournament championship

Credit GS Photo/WMU Media Relations

Western Michigan University will host the University of Michigan this weekend in a CCHA tournament series. The Broncos won the tournament last year. Mlive Kalamazoo Reporter David Drew joined WMUK's Gordon Evans to look at Western's chances in the CCHA tournament. 

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Battle Creek Air National Guard
9:04 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Drone control assigned to Battle Creek Air National Guard Base

Battle Creek Air National Guard Base
Credit The Associated Press

Battle Creek's Air National Guard Base is getting a new mission, but not the one that local leaders had hoped for. Battle Creek Enquirer reporter Jennifer Bowman spoke with WMUK's Gordon Evans Friday morning.

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The Picture Show
7:48 am
Fri March 15, 2013

It's Called 'De-Extinction' — It's Like 'Jurassic Park,' Except It's Real

The bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, lived high in the Pyrenees until its extinction in 2000. Three years later, researchers attempted to clone Celia, the last bucardo. The clone died minutes after birth. Taxidermic specimen, Regional Government of Aragon, Spain
Robb Kendrick National Geographic

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:30 am

Sorry to disappoint, but science writer Carl Zimmer says we're not going to bring back dinosaurs. But, he says, "science has developed to the point where we can actually talk seriously about possibly bringing back more recently extinct species."

It's called "de-extinction" — and it's Zimmer's cover story for National Geographic's April issue.

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StoryCorps
6:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

A 'Good Enough' Dad And His Special Son

Tim Harris (right) and his father, Keith, visited StoryCorps in their hometown of Albuquerque, N.M.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:53 am

In Albuquerque, N.M., there's a restaurant called Tim's Place. It's named after Tim Harris, a young man with Down syndrome who started the business in 2010 with help from his dad, Keith.

Six days a week, Tim greets each customer at the door. He calls it the world's friendliest restaurant.

The day Tim's Place opened "felt awesome," Tim, 27, tells his father on a visit to StoryCorps. "I wanted to own a restaurant ever since I was a kid. That was my dream."

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Author Interviews
6:50 am
Fri March 15, 2013

'Bankers' New Clothes' Leave Too Little Skin In The Game

At a hearing in Washington on March 6, Attorney General Eric Holder admitted to senators why it has been hard to go after big bank executives:

"It does become difficult for us to prosecute them when we are hit with indications that if you do prosecute, if you do bring a criminal charge, it will have a negative impact on the national economy, perhaps even the world economy. And I think that is a function of the fact that some of these institutions have become too large."

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6:30 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Michigan Senate committee approves Great Lakes dredging for grant money

Lead in text: 
Lawmakers want to change policy which has kept grant funding from Natural Resources Trust Fund from being used for dredging.
LANSING -- Great Lakes dredging would become a suitable project for the state Natural Resources Trust Fund to consider when passing out annual grants, according to legislation passed Thursday by the state Senate Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Committee.
6:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Men's basketball: Western Michigan advances to MAC tournament semi-finals

Lead in text: 
Broncos defeat Eastern Michigan 70-55, will play Ohio Friday night in Cleveland
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
CLEVELAND, Ohio - Going back to last season, each of the Western Michigan University basketball team's last four games against Eastern Michigan were tight grinders and the Eagles won three of them. Broncos coach Steve Hawkins knew he had to try to shake things up a bit when the in-state rivals met in the Mid-American Conference Tournament quarterfinals Thursday night at Quicken Loans Arena.
NPR Story
5:44 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Vladimir Putin Hobknobs With ... Steven Seagal

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:44 am

First, Russian President Vladimir Putin granted citizenship to French actor Gerard Depardieu. Now, Putin is hobnobbing with the actor Steven Seagal. The star of Under Siege toured a new sports facility with Putin, who used the occasion to call for reviving a Soviet-era fitness program in which kids threw javelins, learned to ski and fired guns.

NPR Story
5:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

106-Year-Old Woman Finally Gets Her High School Diploma

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:42 am

Reba Williams of Columbus, Ohio, finished her last class back in 1925. But the 106-year-old didn't receive her high school diploma until Wednesday. Her daughter told the Mansfield News-Journal that young Reba, who was a good student for all 12 years, was headstrong. She refused to read a book assigned by her teacher that she'd already read and didn't like.

NPR Story
5:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Tablet Games Go To The Cats

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 7:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Touch-screen devices have opened up video gaming to a whole new demographic: cats. Our last word in business today is: swipe this.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The laser pointer, obviously, is so last century.

Cat-food company Friskies has already made a few tablet games designed specifically for cats to play.

INSKEEP: Yeah, you put your paw right there on the screen.

MONTAGNE: Doesn't it hurt the screen?

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NPR Story
5:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Chavez Faithful Look For A Way To Keep His Memory Alive

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 7:01 am

Ten days after his death, Hugo Chavez's remains are being moved to a museum after being on display at a military academy. The government has been debating what to do with the body long term. His political heirs simply say they want to keep his memory and image alive.

NPR Story
5:12 am
Fri March 15, 2013

JPMorgan In Hot Seat Over London Whale Losses

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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8:42 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Environmental Protection Agency issues final order to Enbridge for additional cleanup

Lead in text: 
Oil pipeline company has five days to respond and 15 days to provide the agency with plan for work along the Kalamazoo River
Enbridge was issued a final administrative order by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Thursday to do additional cleanup along the Kalamazoo River. The order requires dredging in sections of the river above the Ceresco Dam and in the Morrow Lake Delta. Submerged oil and oil-contaminated sediment exists throughout nearly 40 miles of the river, according to the order.

Oliver Wang is a music writer, scholar, and DJ based in California. Since 1994, he's written on popular music, culture, race, and America for outlets such as NPR, Vibe, Wax Poetics, Scratch, The Village Voice, SF Bay Guardian, and LA Weekly.

Wang begins work as an assistant professor in sociology at Long Beach State this fall; He also hosts the renowned audioblog soul-sides.com. For more information, visit o-dub.com.

Music Reviews
6:00 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Lady: Two Soul Stalwarts Find A New Groove Together

R&B singers Nicole Wray and Terri Walker have teamed up as the duo Lady.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:59 am

R&B singers Nicole Wray and Terri Walker both had promising starts to their careers more than ten years ago. Wray came up on the Virginia coast under the wing of mentor Missy Elliott. Walker, a Londoner, was classically trained yet released her debut on a Def Jam subsidiary. Both enjoyed early critical success but by decade's end struggled to find a wide audience. Instead, they found each other.

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Astronomy Events
5:30 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Better get out your binoculars, telescope for Comet PanSTARRS

Comet PanSTARRS as viewed from Austrailia at the beginning of March.
Credit AP Images

An interview with Kalamazoo Astronomical Society members Richard Bell and Mike Sinclair

The Comet PanSTARRS has been within view for about a week now, but the Kalamazoo Astronomical Society has been waiting for a weekend to plan their public watch party. K.A.S. President Richard Bell says a comet is basically a piece of ice and rock leftover from when the planets were formed.

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Shots - Health News
5:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Binge Drinking Sticks Wisconsin With A Hefty Tab

A bartender pours a beer at the Nomad Pub in Milwaukee, Wisc., in 2006.
Darren Hauck Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 9:47 am

Wisconsin has the highest number of binge drinkers in the nation — one in four adults. And binge drinking — defined as five or more alcoholic drinks in a short period of time for men, and four for women — cost the state $6.8 billion in 2012.

That breaks down to about $1,200 per person in higher taxes, more health care, and other costs, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

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Music
5:22 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Musician carries on Beaver Island culture, community

Music on Beaver Island, Michigan, has always been essential to island life, but it also draws the interest of outsiders such as musicologist Alan Lomax, for its unique color, which draws from a history of Irish American fiddling, songs and ballads of the Great Lakes, and a Grand Ol Opry set list established in the 30s, 40s and 50s.

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Europe
4:59 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As Global Chains Move In, The Champs Elysees Gets A New Look

Diners eat at Fouquet's restaurant, a landmark on the Champs Elysees in Paris for more than a century. Traditional cafes and shops are steadily giving way to large global chains.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

Once known as the most beautiful avenue in the world, the Champs Elysees is changing. Some Parisians fear it's starting to look like any American shopping mall as high rents and global chains steadily alter its appearance.

"We just try to keep a sort of diversity on the Champs Elysees, with the cinemas, with restaurants, with cafes and shops," says Deputy Mayor Lynn Cohen-Solal. "We don't think the laws of the natural market, the free market, make for a good Champs Elysees."

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Middle East
4:55 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Courts Become A Battleground For Secularists, Islamists In Syria

An Islamist rebel group in Aleppo called "the Authority for the Promotion of Virtue and Supporting the Oppressed" reviews applications for aid on Feb. 25. In addition to handing out aid, the Islamist group says it is carrying out civilian administration in parts of Aleppo.
Hamid Khatib Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

In rebel-held parts of Syria, a clash of ideologies is playing out. Powerful Islamist brigades are competing with pro-democracy civilians to shape Syria's future.

One battlefront is in the courts. In many areas in northern Syria, Islamists have set up religious courts that deliver rulings under Shariah, or Islamic law — a fundamental change in Syria's civil legal system.

This is evident on a recent day in a courtroom in the northern Syrian city of Azaz.

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Environment
4:34 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

As His Home Melts Away, Teenager Sues Alaska

Nelson Kanuk, a senior at Mt. Edgecumbe High School, is one of six Alaskan youth suing the state, asking it to pay more attention to climate change.
Ed Ronco for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:49 pm

Nelson Kanuk's house is built on a melting tundra. In a year or two, it could be gone.

So the 18-year-old Yup'ik Eskimo is suing the state of Alaska, arguing the state needs to take more action on climate change.

"The river that runs in front of my house is called the Kugkaktlik River, and it means 'the middle one' in the Yup'ik language," Kanuk says.

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4:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Emergency Financial Manager officially appointed for Detroit

Lead in text: 
Kevyn Orr will be paid $275,000, will start March 25th.
Lansing - Michigan's emergency loan board approved Kevyn Orr as Detroit's emergency manager after a 15-minute videoconference question-and-answer session with the Washington D.C. attorney from the board meeting room in the state Treasury building. The three-member board consists of State Treasurer Andy Dillon, Budget Director John Nixon and Steve Arwood, director of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.
Author Interviews
4:19 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Two Awards In One Day For 'Battleborn' Author Claire Vaye Watkins

Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection of short stories — Battleborn — is informed by her childhood in the West.
Riverhead Books

The 10 stories in Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection — Battleborn — explore the past and present of the American West, specifically Nevada, where Watkins spent much of her childhood and adolescence. On Wednesday, it was announced that the 28-year-old author had won two major literary prizes for Battleborn: the $10,000 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the $20,000 Story Prize.

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The Two-Way
4:19 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

After Weeks Of Wrangling, An Israeli Government Takes Shape

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrives for a meeting in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, on Thursday. Netanyahu has reached agreement with other factions to form a coalition government following an election in January.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:55 am

Israel appears to have a new government, nearly two months after parliamentary elections.

Since the voting in January, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been trying to put together the pieces of a puzzle that just would not fit.

If he included traditional allies, such as the religious parties, he would close out a chance of forming a government with a popular political newcomer, Yair Lapid.

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Food
4:18 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Molly Malone: A Soup And Song For St. Patrick's Day

Rachel Allen's recipe for Molly Malone's Cockle and Mussel Chowder derives its name from a popular Irish folk song.
David Loftus

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 6:48 pm

There's always the temptation of heading to an Irish pub, grabbing a pint of Guinness and chowing down on some cabbage and potatoes when March 17 rolls around.

However, there's much more to Irish cuisine than that, says Rachel Allen, a well-known TV chef in Ireland who is appreciated for her simple, doable recipes that champion the country's fresh produce, meats and seafood.

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Media
3:24 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jake Tapper Takes A Host Chair At CNN

The veteran reporter has recently moved from ABC News to CNN where he now hosts his own show and serves as Chief Washington Correspondent. In Part II of this interview, Tapper talks about fact-checking the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth and blow back from the White House after asking tough questions.

Arts & Life
2:44 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

How Dictionary Searches Define Readers

After Vice President Joe Biden used the term "malarkey" in a 2012 debate, searches for the word in online dictionaries surged. Now that dictionaries are readily available with a mouse click or finger tap, dictionary publishers can track the correlation between word searches and current events.

Law
1:37 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

'Cannibal Cop' Case: The Line Between Fantasy And Crime

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:38 pm

Jurors in a New York federal court found a former New York City police officer guilty of plotting to kidnap and cook his wife and other women. The defense argued that Gilberto Valle never acted on his fantasies, and described the verdict as a case of thought prosecution.

Asia
1:37 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

North Korea's Threats Grow More Ominous

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:38 pm

North Korea scrapped the 1953 armistice agreement that ended the Korean War, escalating fears of a preemptive nuclear attack on the U.S. Tuft University Korean studies professor Sung-Yoon Lee discusses this precarious moment for North Korea, its neighbors and the international community.

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