6:15 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Gun control discussed at Van Buren County forum

Lead in text: 
School security, emergency preparedness also discussed by education and law enforcement officials
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- Although the opinions presented at a community forum on gun control widely varied Tuesday night, there seemed to be consensus in one area -- the issue is not going away any time soon The forum, which was sponsored by the South Haven Diversity Coalition and held on the campus of the Lake Michigan College South Haven campus, drew more than 70 people.
Latin America
5:08 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Venezuelans Mourns Late President Hugo Chavez

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Venezuela is in a state of mourning for its late president, Hugo Chavez. The outsized leader died yesterday in the capital, Caracas, after a two-year battle with cancer. He was 58. Hugo Chavez was both a polarizing and charismatic figure, and during his long rule he became an icon, beloved by Venezuela's poor and others in the region who admired his defiant stance toward the U.S.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chicago Commuters Brace For Delays During Bridge Repair

Construction on Chicago's Wells Street Bridge is taking place around the clock, as crews replace the south leaf section. The north leaf section will be replaced in the spring. The double-decked steel truss drawbridge was built in 1922.
David Schaper NPR

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

A major artery that feeds Chicago's downtown business district has been temporarily cut off as crews work around the clock this week to replace half of the 91-year-old Wells Street drawbridge.

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Business
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR business news starts with markets on fire.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Latin America
4:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Chavez's Death Will Have Ramifications For Cuba

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The death of Hugo Chavez could mean as much for Cuba as it will for Venezuela. As we just heard, Chavez looked to Fidel Castro for inspiration, and Castro has supplied Venezuela with thousands of Cuban doctors, health workers and security specialists. In return, Chavez sent a massive amount of Venezuelan oil to Cuba at cut-rate prices, and thus helped keep the Cuban economy afloat during years of crisis.

Joining us now is NPR's Tom Gjelten. Good morning.

TOM GJELTEN, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Carrie started at KUNM as a volunteer in the front office, and soon after her arrival she became a regular substitute in the news department. Carrie is a graduate of Clemson University and a South Carolina native; however, she has fallen in love with the natural beauty and hospitality of the Southwest. In addition to her duties in the newsroom, she spends her free time hiking and skiing with her husband. Carrie's career in broadcasting is just beginning, and she hopes to pursue her passion for this field by continuing to host and report for New Mexico's Community Powered Public Radio.

U.S.
3:46 am
Wed March 6, 2013

With Adaptive Skiing, Disabled People No Longer Left Out In The Cold

Tilghman Logan and his instructor, Craig Stagg, do some practice turns using sit skis. Some ski resorts have created opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in snow sports.
Carrie Jung KUNM

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

March means spring break is just around the corner, and for New Mexico it means mild temperatures and fresh snow — perfect conditions for visiting area ski resorts.

A growing number of resorts are now offering programs that cater to vacationers with disabilities, and resort owners say it has proved to be a boost for business.

At a Taos Ski Valley chairlift, Barbara and Philip Logan prepare their son, Tilghman, for his first day of ski lessons.

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World
3:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

John Kerry, A 'Recovering Politician,' Settles Into Diplomatic Role

John Kerry, on his first trip abroad as secretary of state, walks with French President Francois Hollande after their meeting at Elysee Palace in Paris on Feb. 27. Kerry's nine-day trip took him through Europe and the Middle East.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:44 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry describes himself as a recovering politician. He's just getting used to the fact that he can't speak quite as freely as he did when he was a senator.

"Each word means more, each relationship is played differently," he said in an interview with NPR, at the end of a nine-nation swing through Europe and the Middle East. "As a senator, you just don't have those stakes riding in it."

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It's All Politics
3:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

The Boehner Rule? Speaker Bucks House GOP For Some Legislation

House Speaker John Boehner answers reporters' questions after the weekly House Republican caucus meeting with (from left) Rep. Kevin McCarthy, Rep. Lynn Jenkins, Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Rep. Steve Daines on Tuesday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

House Speaker John Boehner held a news conference the day after the November election.

"The American people have spoken," he said. "They've re-elected President Obama. And they've again re-elected a Republican majority in the House of Representatives."

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Author Interviews
3:31 am
Wed March 6, 2013

In Sly Self-Help Novel, Selling Clean Water Gets You 'Filthy Rich'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

Mohsin Hamid's newest novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, takes its structure from the genre of self-help tutorials. Chapter 1: Move to the City. Chapter 2: Get an Education. Chapter 3: Don't Fall in Love (the book's nameless protagonist, who transforms from rural peasant to corporate tycoon, fails to follow this last directive). After all, the dogged pursuit of success doesn't happen in a vacuum.

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Sweetness And Light
3:21 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Catholic Universities See True Path To Salvation: Basketball

DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Providence, St. John's, Seton Hall and Villanova universities have decided to leave the Big East Conference and pursue a new basketball framework.
Todd Taulman iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

I've always felt it's no coincidence that some basketball powerhouses — let us say, off the top of my head, Duke, Kentucky, Kansas and Indiana — get a few better players because those hoops museums don't do very well with football.

I mean, if I were a big-deal high school recruit, I might very well say to myself, "You know, I'd rather be a Hoosier or a Wildcat or a Jayhawk than I would go someplace where I'm just gonna be a lounge act for the glamorous Mr. Touchdowns."

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Cloud Cult's 'Love' Channels A Life Tested By Loss

Cloud Cult's new album is titled Love.
Cody York Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 11:18 am

The latest Morning Edition "Music Moment" focuses on the band Cloud Cult. The group is known to fans for making music to soothe the soul, as it does on the new album Love.

"This album really looks at all the different aspects of the self that need to be healed up in order to facilitate the process of stepping aside and allowing love to speak for our life rather than our wounds," lead singer Craig Minowa says.

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8:36 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Environmentalists blast forestry bill approved by state Senate

Lead in text: 
Bill would remove biodiversity from Michigan Department of Natural Resources' list of forest management duties.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
LANSING, MI -- The Michigan Senate today approved a forest diversity bill that has drawn strong opposition from various environmental groups, who argue that it poses a significant setback to conservation efforts around the state. Senate Bill 79, introduced by Republican Sen.
8:13 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Holland Township considers fireworks restrictions

Lead in text: 
Change in state law last year left restrictions up to local units of government.
Numerous complaints about fireworks in the two weeks prior to and after Independence Day has prompted Holland Charter Township to consider limiting the usage. The Holland Township Board will consider the first reading of that ordinance Thursday at its regular meeting. If that passes, a public hearing will take place at 7 p.m.
Theater
6:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

For This Pair Of Clowns, 'Old Hats' Means New Laughs

Nellie McKay, David Shiner and Bill Irwin use old-time comedy, newfangled tricks and zany music to score laughs in their new theatrical revue, Old Hats.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 7:14 pm

Twenty years ago, theatrical clowns Bill Irwin and David Shiner collaborated on a Broadway show called Fool Moon — a giddy mixture of slapstick, improv and audience participation that proved such a success that it came back to Broadway for two more runs and toured both the U.S. and Europe. Now Irwin and Shiner have put together a new show called Old Hats, and it's been receiving rave reviews off-Broadway.

Irwin and Shiner's rubber-faced, loose-bodied clowning hasn't gotten easier over two decades.

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Latin America
6:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Rivalries And Infighting Could Follow In Wake Of Chavez's Death

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Joining us now to talk about what comes next is NPR's Tom Gjelten. He's covered Latin America for us.

And, Tom, Hugo Chavez, such a dominating figure in Venezuela. What happens now in the immediate aftermath of his death?

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Business
6:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

As Construction Picks Up, American Truck Makers Race

Ford unveils the F-150 Atlas concept pickup during January's North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Experts say the boom in construction will boost pickup sales.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 7:34 pm

Economists look at many tea leaves as they try to determine the health of the economy. One of the most important surrounds vehicle sales, and more specifically pickup truck sales, which are tied to the construction industry. And as last month's sales rose 18 percent, the auto industry is betting big on a real estate rebound.

It's arguable that the Ford F-150 is the most important vehicle to come out of Detroit since the Model-T. It's also built where many parts for the old Model-T were made in Dearborn, Mich.

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Middle East
5:29 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Kerry: We're Trying To Offer Syrian President A Rational Choice

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As Secretary of State John Kerry wraps up his first official trip overseas, he's walking a fine line on Syria. Kerry says the Obama administration has been stepping up assistance to rebels who are trying to topple the Syrian regime. But the U.S. is also worried about how all of this will play out. NPR's Michele Kelemen spoke with the secretary of State today in Doha, Qatar, and he said he's taking this one step at a time.

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Remembrances
5:29 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Venezuela's Chavez: An Outsized Personality, A Domineering Figure

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez speaks in a televised address in January 2002 at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas. Chavez vowed justice for two men who were shot and killed Jan. 3 at a political rally in a battle between Chavez supporters, opposition marchers and security forces.
Miraflores/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

A fiery leftist, Hugo Chavez was a steadfast ally of dictators like Cuba's Fidel Castro while loudly opposing the United States. He claimed capitalism was destroying the world and tried to transform Venezuela into a socialist state. Millions of Venezuelans loved him because he showered the poor with social programs.

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Sports
5:29 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

No Obvious Favorites As NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament Starts

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR.

Every spring, you hear that almost anyone can win March Madness. Well, this year, it's true. There's no obvious favorite in this month's NCAA men's basketball tournament, at least a dozen contenders from schools big and small. And conference championships began today. So who knows which contender will fall on its face and which dark horse no one considered will emerge in the next two weeks?

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Manslaughter Charges Upgraded In Florida A&M Hazing Case

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

Twelve former members of the Florida A&M marching band are charged in the hazing death of drum major Robert Champion. The charges have now been upgraded to manslaughter. Champion's parents said Tuesday that they are encouraged by the stiffer charges.

NPR Story
4:50 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Posthumous Pardon For Heavyweight Boxer Jack Johnson A Bipartisan Effort

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some members of Congress have put aside partisan sparring in defense of a legendary fighter. Republican Senator John McCain and Democratic Senator Harry Reid are among those calling for a posthumous pardon for the heavyweight boxing champion Jack Johnson. Johnson became the first black man to win that title back in 1908. His next win in 1910 sparked race riots and his relationships with white women added to the controversy.

Here's actor Samuel L. Jackson as Johnson in the 2005 Ken Burns documentary, "Unforgivable Blackness."

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3:21 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Detroit plans appeal against emergency financial manager

Lead in text: 
The city of Detroit is preparing its appeal to prevent an emergency financial manager from running the city. Governor Rick Snyder announced on Friday that the city is in a state of financial emergency, and that he plans to appoint an emergency financial manager to solve the city’s problems.
Detroit - Residents and others from communities under emergency management turned up at Tuesday's City Council meeting, urging leaders to wage a legal battle against a state takeover. "This is a dark time for us," said Detroit resident Lillian Scott Jr. "It's time for you all to stand together and take this to court.
Around the Nation
3:20 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Sequestered Spring Means Fewer Rangers, Services At National Parks

Hikers walk on the Mist Trail to Vernal Fall at Yosemite National Park in California. The National Park Service has to cut $134 million from sites around the country, including Yosemite, due to the lack of a budget deal in Congress.
Gosia Wozniacka AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 11:49 am

Spring has come early to the Yosemite Valley, and the melting snow makes for a spectacular rush of water off the granite face of Yosemite Falls, the tallest in North America.

Early March is when park officials would normally be gearing up for the busy tourist season. Instead, they're figuring out how to cut $1.5 million from their budget. Without a budget deal, the sequestration has forced the Park Service to cut a total of $134 million from sites around the country.

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3:18 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Bill would require higher patient-to-staff ratios in hospitals

Lead in text: 
Nurses unions and lawmakers want the state to require a minimum number of staff in Michigan hospitals. According to the Lansing State Journal, the bills would mandate things like having one nurse to every four patients in pediatric units.
The Michigan Nurses Association joined Democratic lawmakers Monday in their push to make Michigan the second state to mandate hospital staffing levels, but hospital officials expressed concern the requirement could backfire due to higher costs. Democratic Sen. Rebekah Warren of Ann Arbor and Rep.
3:17 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Salvation Army plans expansion in Battle Creek

Lead in text: 
3,400 square foot addition will include community room, chapel and a day camp area.
When the Salvation Army moved from its home on Van Buren Street to the former McKinley Elementary School at Union and Capital Avenue Northeast, the leadership had hopes of expanding, but the focus then was meeting the immediate needs of the community.
3:11 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Charter school proposed for elite athletes in Kalamazoo and Battle Creek

Lead in text: 
Grant filed with Michigan Education Department for proposed Legacy Academy says it would serve grades 7-12.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- A charter school that would cater to the specific needs of teenage elite athletes -- specifically in hockey, soccer and figure skating -- is being proposed for the Kalamazoo/Battle Creek area.
Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Infections With 'Nightmare Bacteria' Are On The Rise In U.S. Hospitals

Klebsiella pneumoniae, seen here with an electron microscope, are the most common superbugs causing highly drug-resistant infections in hospitals.
Kwangshin Kim Science Source

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:34 pm

Federal officials warned Tuesday that an especially dangerous group of superbugs has become a significant health problem in hospitals throughout the United States.

These germs, known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, have become much more common in the last decade, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the risk they pose to health is becoming evident.

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Author Interviews
2:14 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

'Out Of Order' At The Court: O'Connor On Being The First Female Justice

Sandra Day O'Connor is sworn in as an associate justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger on Sept. 25, 1981. Holding two family Bibles is husband John Jay O'Connor.
Michael Evans AP

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 4:15 pm

Sandra Day O'Connor wasn't expecting the call from President Reagan that would change her life that day in 1981.

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Around the Nation
1:42 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Drones Come Home, Privacy Concerns Fly High

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:45 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, filling in for Neal Conan. It's a bird! It's a plane! Nope, it's an unmanned aircraft, also called a drone. Some can be as small as a microwave. Others can recognize a tennis shoe from 60,000 feet above the ground. And now, law enforcement agencies across the country are getting approval from the federal government to use these mechanical eyeballs here in the U.S.

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