6:27 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Calhoun and Jackson Counties discuss partnership on some road responsibilities

Lead in text: 
Counties considering plan to share some staff and combining resources like sign shops
Officials in Jackson and Calhoun counties are talking about ways the two governments can share some road responsibilities. Discussions are only preliminary, but both sides said combining some aspects of their separate road departments could help save money while improving local roads.
6:13 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Schoolcraft building consolidation plan will keep all four schools open

Lead in text: 
Superintendent says plan chosen by board was the best and the least costly
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
SCHOOLCRAFT, MI - Schoolcraft Community Schools has approved a building consolidation plan that will keep all four buildings open but realign elementary classes.
Latin America
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Mexican President Shifts Focus From Drugs To Progress

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:48 am

Mexico's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has been in office for three months, and despite his claims that he's fighting drug violence with a new strategy, there are no signs the situation is any better. The president prefers to focus on Mexico's economic potential and has been touring the country, giving pep talks wherever he goes.

NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Maine, Tribes Seek 'Truth And Reconciliation'

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:54 am

In Maine, an unusual and historic process is under way to document child welfare practices that once resulted in Indian children being forcibly removed from their homes. Many of the native children were placed with white foster parents. Chiefs from all five of Maine's tribes, along with Gov. Paul LePage, have created a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to help heal the wounds.

NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

What American Catholics Want From The Next Pontiff

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Awaiting the white smoke from the Sistine Chapel are many of the 75 million Catholics in the U.S., and the question comes up, what do American Catholics want to see in the next pope? The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life explored that question in recent surveys. Here with the findings is Pew senior researcher Greg Smith. Good morning.

GREG SMITH: Good morning.

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Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

All Tech Considered
4:29 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Self-Tracking Apps To Help You 'Quantify' Yourself

Noah Zandan shows off his Zeo sleep-tracking headband. His other self-tracking devices are on his wrists. Noah and his father, Peter, are both part of the growing "Quantified Self" movement.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:11 am

Technology has made it easier than ever to track your activity levels, your sleep cycles, how you spend your time, and more. The self-trackers who near-obsessively capture and analyze their own data are part of a growing "Quantified Self" movement.

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Latin America
3:58 am
Tue March 12, 2013

In Upcoming Venezuelan Vote, Hugo Chavez Looms Large

An image of late President Hugo Chavez hangs behind acting President Nicolas Maduro, as he speaks to supporters after registering his candidacy outside the national electoral council in Caracas, Venezuela, on Monday.
Ariana Cubillos AP

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:17 am

The tall and imposing Nicolas Maduro stepped forward last week to be sworn in as Venezuela's interim leader following the death of President Hugo Chavez.

Before the country's packed congressional hall, he swore to complete Chavez's dream to transform the OPEC power into a socialist state, allied with Cuba and decidedly opposed to capitalism and U.S. interests in Latin America.

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The Salt
3:58 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Mississippi Passes 'Anti-Bloomberg' Bill

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:11 pm

Mayor Mike and his public health edicts are having a rough ride.

On Monday, a state judge in Manhattan struck down New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's rule capping soda sizes. And lawmakers in Mississippi are taking the backlash against government regulation on food marketing one step further.

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Arts & Life
3:51 am
Tue March 12, 2013

'Bowery Boys' Are Amateur But Beloved New York Historians

Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:12 pm

In the 19th century, the Bowery Boys were a street gang that ruled that small section of Manhattan. In the 21st century, the Bowery Boys are two best friends — Tom Meyers and Greg Young — who record a do-it-yourself podcast with the same name.

Meyers and Young love to perform almost as much as they love New York City, and their show traces the unofficial history of the place. They record a few blocks from — you guessed it — the Bowery district.

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Classical Literature
7:50 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

World language students to host marathon reading of 'The Aeneid'

'Aeneas' Flight from Troy' by Federico Barrocci
Credit http://www.ibiblio.org

What could be more epic than reading an epic poem in the way it would have been read more than two thousand years ago? How about reading it in English from beginning to end? The Western Michigan University World Languages department is doing a live marathon reading of Virgil’s The Aeneid on Friday.

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Music, Theatre, & Dance
7:37 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

'A Soldier's Tale': A musical look at what it means to be a soldier

The CD cover for American Chamber Winds' recording of 'A Soldier's Tale'

For as long as there have been wars, there have been stories about the brave soldiers who fought in them. But what about the others? On Friday, Fontana Chamber Arts and the Western Michigan University School of Music, along with WMU actors and dancers, will tell a story about a very different kind of soldier.

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Music Interviews
5:36 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

The Creator Of 'Chillwave,' On California's Complications

Toro y Moi's latest album is titled Anything in Return.
Andrew Paynter Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:48 pm

Chaz Bundick is the producer and singer-songwriter credited with pioneering a new genre of music called chillwave: a mix of electronic, hip-hop and dance music. Think house music meets R&B.

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Owens Valley Salty As Los Angeles Water Battle Flows Into Court

Owens Lake — which dried up after losing its water source, the Owens River, to Los Angeles — is known to be a source of air pollution. The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:30 pm

In the West, fights over water last a long time.

It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away. That water allowed L.A. to become the metropolis it is today.

But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.

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Remembrances
4:40 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Remembering Lillian Cahn, Creator Of The Coach Handbag

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

Lillian Cahn, co-founder of Coach Leatherwear Co., died March 4 at the age of 89. Cahn was the force behind today's high-end leather handbags.

Back in the 1960s, she and her husband, Miles Cahn, were running a leather goods business in Manhattan. They produced men's wallets and billfolds but wanted to expand.

"My wife had a great sense of style, and she made the suggestions that we men maybe were a little thoughtless about," Miles Cahn says with a laugh. "Among her many suggestions was: 'Why don't we make pocketbooks?' I like to tell people I scoffed at the suggestion."

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Obama Team Stops Saying 'Global War On Terror' But Doesn't Stop Waging It

Standing in front of the Constitution, President Obama delivers an address on national security and terrorism in 2009 at the National Archives in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush often made a provocative claim: He argued that the U.S. was fighting a war without a typical battlefield. In effect, he said, this war is everywhere.

"Our enemies make no distinction based on borders," he said in a 2007 speech in Michigan. "They view the world as a giant battlefield and will strike wherever they can."

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Ryan Loyd is Texas Public Radio's city beat and political reporter who brings more than a decade of news experience back to his hometown.

Ryan began reporting at KGNB radio in New Braunfels, followed by KTSA. He worked in television news in Joplin, MO, San Antonio, Sherman, Texas, and Austin.

Since joining TPR in October 2011, Ryan has covered stories of local, state and national interest including the 2012 Democratic National Convention, where San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro delivered the keynote address.

Business
4:09 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

In Trendy World Of Fast Fashion, Styles Aren't Made To Last

Prices at stores like Forever 21 are so low, "it's virtually impossible to walk out empty-handed," says Elizabeth Cline, who writes about fast fashion.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

When she got out of college and moved to New York, Elizabeth Cline liked to shop at vintage-clothing stores. They were the kinds of places tucked away on side streets in Manhattan and Brooklyn, where a lot of hunting and a little luck might reward you with a great, inexpensive cocktail dress that no one else had.

Then she discovered the world of "fast fashion" — chains like Forever 21, H&M and Zara — and it redefined her whole notion of bargain shopping.

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SW Michigan
4:05 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Oil spill in 2010 not a threat to drinking water

Kalamazoo River re-opens in 2012 (file photo)
Credit WMUK

A new state report says the 2010 Kalamazoo River oil spill did not cause contamination of residential water wells that threatens human health. The final “health assessment” by the Department of Community Health says no oil-related organic compounds were found in wells near the disaster in Calhoun and Kalamazoo counties.

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The Impact Of War Project
3:51 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Four-Legged Warriors Show Signs Of PTSD

Bernie Green is a supervisor with the Department of Defense's Military Working Dog Breeding Program. Experts say dogs can suffer from PTSD-like conditions that can affect their military capabilities later on.
Ryan Loyd KSTX

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 8:04 pm

For years, PTSD — or post-traumatic stress disorder — has been an issue for military members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

But humans aren't the only ones with problems. Military dogs returning from war zones are also showing signs of PTSD. And there's evidence that these canines need some extra tender loving care after their tours of duty.

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WMUK News
2:33 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

The Living Building Challenge at WMU

LBC building: the Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Lab
Credit Living Building Challenge.org

When is a building like a flower? One answer is: when it is built according to the standards of the Living Building Challenge™. The initiative launched by the International Living Future Institute seeks to reduce or eliminate the effect of human structures on the natural world.  

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The Opinion Page
2:12 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Op-Ed: We Need More Aaron Swartz-Style Hacktivism

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:58 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

And now the Opinion Page. The release of millions of academic papers by Internet activist Aaron Swartz raised many questions about how much access the public should have to scholarship, questions that took on new dimensions after his suicide. At the time of his death, Swartz faced federal charges of wire fraud and violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

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Asia
2:07 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Japan's Broken Coast Struggles To Recover

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:53 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Digital Life
2:01 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

The 'Nasty Effect': How Comments Color Comprehension

Researchers found that exposure to uncivil comments can polarize opinion on news issues.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:56 pm

At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But Web-savvy news junkies have known for a long time that reader feedback can often turn nasty. Now a study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can even change the way we interpret the news.

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1:06 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick guilty of racketeering and extortion

Lead in text: 
Former Detroit mayor was convicted on 24 of 30 counts
Kilpatrick and Ferguson were found guilty on multiple counts of extortion. Kilpatrick was also found guilty on several charges of mail fraud, wire fraud and for filing false taxes. Bernard Kilpatrick was convicted on one tax count.There was no verdict for Bernard Kilpatrick on the racketeering charge.U.S.
Music Reviews
12:52 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Tegan And Sara Reach Out To New Audiences With 'Heartthrob'

Twin sisters Tegan and Sara Quin have been writing songs since they were 15 and independently released their first full-length album in 1999. Since then, they've produced seven studio albums.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:06 pm

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Mental Health
12:07 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the season of reflection, for many religious people around the world. The importance of repentance and forgiveness are often a focus this time of year. But faith leaders aren't the only people who talk about the importance of forgiveness.

Recently, on this program, we talked about the work of psychologists who are trying to teach people how to practice forgiveness. They note that there are often physical and emotional benefits to forgiveness.

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Politics
12:03 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Dr. Ben Carson: Healthcare Is 'Upside Down'

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 2:01 pm

Dr. Ben Carson is known for blazing trails in the neurological field — including breakthrough work separating conjoined twins. Now he's making waves for his political views. Host Michel Martin talks with Carson about the current state of health care in America and his upcoming speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

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Health Care
11:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Medical Trials Need More Diversity

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
11:56 am
Mon March 11, 2013

'Frankenstein's Cat': Bioengineering The Animals Of The Future

Cover of Frankenstein's Cat

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:52 pm

In her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts, science journalist Emily Anthes talks about how the landscape of bioengineering has expanded since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996. Scientists, she says, are now working to create pigs that can grow organs for human transplant, goats that produce valuable protein-rich milk, and cockroaches that could potentially serve as tiny scouts into danger zones for the military.

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