NPR Story
11:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

String Theory: Fascinating, Not Science Fiction

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:11 pm

Tell Me More has been honoring Black History Month by speaking with African-Americans who've excelled in STEM fields — science, technology, engineering and math. Sylvester James Gates Jr. spent his career researching string theory. He explains to host Michel Martin that, while it seems like science fiction, it's really anything but.

NPR Story
11:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Black Reverend: Guns Are Important To My Church

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:11 pm

Gun violence devastates many predominantly African-American neighborhoods in places across the country. But some faith leaders feel that legal access to guns is part of the solution, not the problem. Host Michel Martin speaks with Reverend Kenn Blanchard about why he wants his congregation to have wider access to guns.

NPR Story
11:52 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Digging Deeper On African American Leaders

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:11 pm

You might think you know all there is to know about Martin Luther King Jr. But author Andrea Davis Pinkney digs deeper. She talks with host Michel Martin about her award-winning book, Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America.

Local Music
11:31 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Kalamazoo Singers present sacred Schubert, Vivaldi

Rick Phelps
Credit Michael Lanka

Rick Phelps, who became conductor of the Kalamazoo Singers two seasons ago, will lead the 37 year-old choir in a program of two sacred masterworks Sunday at Holy Family Chapel at Nazareth. 

He talks about the privilege of conducting an experienced adult choir and highlights a number of special features in Vivaldi’s “Gloria” RV 589 and Schubert’s “Mass in G” D. 187.

Read more
9:45 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Poll finds most Michigan voters agree more road funding needed

Lead in text: 
Majority of those who say more should be spent on roads say they would be willing to pay more in fees and taxes.
LANSING, MI -- Most Michigan voters believe the state should invest more money in roads, and many of those individuals are willing to pay more in taxes and fees to get the job done, according to the results of a new statewide poll.
Around the Nation
7:28 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Princeton University To Give Away Free Homes

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news for folks looking to acquire a new home. Princeton University is giving some houses away for free. They are fixer-uppers, offered as is, but did I mention they're free? The old houses, which have been used as offices, need to be taken off campus to make room for a new art and transit project. Prospective owners will need to pick up their new homes. So a free house, delivery not included. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:12 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Tooth Fairy Survey: Rate Went Up 15 Percent in 2012

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne with an economic indicator found under children's pillows.

The latest Tooth Fairy survey shows the average rate for lost teeth went up 15 percent last year. Illinois based provider Delta Dental says the gain is similar to the jump the S&P 500 saw last year. The average Tooth Fairy gift was just over $2.40. The real moneymaker is the first lost tooth, worth a full dollar more.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:31 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Holland City Council debates human relations post

Lead in text: 
City has considered reorganization since retirement of Human Relations Director Al Serrano
Calling the issue of human relation issues a "volatile" topic in the country and city, a member of the city Human Relations Commission challenged the city council Wednesday night to reconsider cuts to the department.
6:26 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Educators fear cuts as sequester deadline nears

Lead in text: 
Cut would be small percentage of overall school spending, but would programs like special education and Head Start.
Area school districts and preschool providers nervously watched the countdown to deep federal spending cuts this week, unsure exactly what kind of effect that might have on the area. The federal sequestration spending cuts set to begin Friday could cut $84.7 million from Michigan education programs, according to an analysis from the Washington-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.
6:18 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Men's basketball: Western Michigan 65 Toledo 62

Lead in text: 
Broncos regain sole possession of first place in Mid-American Conference West Division.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
TOLEDO, OH - "Tired" and "sore" were two of the first words uttered by Western Michigan University's Darius Paul and David Brown, respectively, outside of the visitor's locker room Wednesday night at Toledo's Savage Arena. Imagine how the Rockets must feel - Paul and Brown wore THEM out during a 65-62 statement-making victory in a Mid-American Conference West Division first-place showdown.
NPR Story
5:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Democrats Move To Reinstate Assault Weapons Ban

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A hearing on Capitol Hill yesterday included tears, cheers and a recording of bursts of gunfire. It was all part of a new push by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee to reinstate a ban on assault weapons, a ban that expired nearly a decade ago.

NPR's David Welna was there.

Read more
NPR Story
5:59 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Sequester Cuts Could Affect Air Safety

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

Read more
Business
4:42 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Experts Boil Telecommuting Decisions Down To Flexibility Vs. Serendipity

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

Yahoo touched off a debate about the effectiveness of telecommuting when it told employees last week that they may no longer work from home. The policy change was made, according to the company's internal email, to enhance workplace collaboration.

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, who happens to be a new mother, drew fierce criticism from those who say she should embrace, rather than reject, flexible work arrangements.

What exactly is lost and what's gained when people work from home?

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Thu February 28, 2013

What Happened To The Aid Meant To Rebuild Haiti?

Many homes that were rebuilt after the earthquake in 2010 are even more dangerous than the original ones. This three-story home was put up after the quake but is already slated for demolition to make way for an 18-unit housing project.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:39 pm

After a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, governments and foundations from around the world pledged more than $9 billion to help get the country back on its feet.

Only a fraction of the money ever made it. And Haiti's President Michel Martelly says the funds aren't "showing results."

Read more
Author Interviews
3:17 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Dictionary Of Idioms Gets Everybody On The Same Page

The "elephant in the room" is something obvious that can't be overlooked, even if no one is talking about it. The phrase was in use as early as 1935.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 12:04 pm

If you've ever shot the breeze, had a heart-to-heart or bent somebody's ear — in fact, if you've ever talked at all — odds are you've used an idiom. These sometimes bizarre phrases are a staple of conversation, and more than 10,000 of them are collected in the latest edition of The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, which came out this week.

Read more
The Salt
8:15 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Budweiser May Seem Watery, But It Tests At Full Strength, Lab Says

Plaintiffs accuse Anheuser-Busch of misleading consumers about the alcohol content in Bud Light, Budweiser and other products. The brewer denies the claims.
Gary C. Caskey UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 3:14 pm

Update at 7:35 p.m. ET: Beer Is At Full Strength, Tests Say

Samples of Budweiser and other Anheuser-Busch InBev beers were found to be in line with their advertised alcohol content, according to lab tests conducted at NPR's request. We've rewritten portions of this post to reflect that new information.

Anheuser-Busch is accused of misleading beer drinkers about the alcohol content of Budweiser and other products, in a series of class-action lawsuits filed in federal court.

Read more
8:10 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Macomb County Judge selected to fill vacancy on Michigan Supreme Court

Lead in text: 
David Viviano's seat on the state's highest court will be up for election in 2014.
LANSING - Macomb County Circuit Court Judge David Viviano will become the next state Supreme Court justice, replacing ex-Justice Diane Hathaway who resigned in January amidst a scandal over a short sale of her Grosse Pointe Park home. Viviano, 41, was elected to the Macomb County Circuit Court in 2006 and serves as its chief judge.
7:54 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Ingham County Judge extends grand jury investigation into party-switching scheme

Lead in text: 
Former State Representative Roy Schmidt switched parties last year. House Speaker Jase Bolger assisted Schmidt and suggested he find a straw Democratic candidate for the ballot.
LANSING, MI - A one-judge grand jury looking into the political party switch scheme involving then-Rep. Roy Schmidt and Michigan House Speaker Jase Bolger is going to continue its investigation. Ingham County Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina is handling the inquiry into the scheme hatched by Schmidt - then a Grand Rapids state lawmaker - and the Republican House speaker last year.
All Tech Considered
5:57 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

As States Embrace Online Gambling, Questions Arise

Internet gambling has become legal in New Jersey and Nevada, but experts say enforcement and regulations still need to be straightened out.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 6:35 pm

Several states are rushing to establish a foothold in online gambling — an activity that federal officials were only recently trying to ban.

Just a while ago, the federal government actually viewed online gambling as a crime. Lately, the Obama administration has taken a more permissive stance. It now allows states to sell lottery tickets online.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had expressed reservations about online gambling a month ago and had vetoed an earlier version of the bill. But in the end, the pressure to sign the legislation was just too great.

Read more
Middle East
5:12 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

U.S. Plans To Offer More Direct Aid To Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 5:57 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Obama administration is rethinking its strategy in Syria. As the death toll mounts and a diplomatic solution seems out of reach, the administration is planning to do more to help Syrian rebels. That could involve what's referred to as direct, non-lethal assistance. It does not include weapons.

Secretary of State John Kerry is talking about all this in Rome with members of the Syrian opposition, and NPR's Michele Kelemen is traveling with him.

Read more
The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
5:12 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Sequester Spells Uncertainty For Many Public Schools

Children eat breakfast at a federally funded Head Start program. Many Head Start administrators are concerned they may have to cut back on the number of enrolled children if the sequester moves ahead.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 5:57 pm

If Congress and the Obama administration can't agree on a budget deal by Friday, the federal government will be forced to cut $85 billion from just about every federally funded program. Every state could lose federal aid, and a myriad of government programs could shut down or curtail services — and that includes the nation's public schools.

Read more
WMUK News
4:50 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

WMU union protests "political bullying"

WMU PIO member at WMU Board meeting
Credit WMUK

The union that represents part-time Western Michigan University instructors says university trustees should stand up to what it calls political "bullying" in Lansing. Union members packed Wednesday's meeting of Western's Board of Trustees to drive the point home.  

Read more

Bill Zeeble has been a full-time reporter at KERA since 1992, covering everything from medicine to the Mavericks and education to environmental issues. Heâââ

Deceptive Cadence
4:28 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Remembering Van Cliburn, A Giant Among Pianists And A Cold War Idol

A youthful Van Cliburn, captured mid-concerto.
Courtesy of the Van Cliburn Foundation

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 11:37 am

Read more
The Salt
3:47 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Do Parents Really Know What Their Kids Are Eating?

Donta Jackson's snack of choice is a bag of Skittles.
Brett Myers Youth Radio

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:09 pm

After school and evening are "crunch time" for most families. It's the time when crucial decisions get made that affect kids' fitness and weight. And that includes snacking.

To get an idea of what parents thought their kids were doing during this time, NPR conducted a poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. Youth Radio's Chantell Williams talked about the findings with teens and their parents.

Read more
Health Care
2:04 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

The Changing Politics Of Health Care

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now it's a supersize edition of the Political Junkie. Ken Rudin, of course, is staying with us. John Kasich, Rick Scott, now, Chris Christie - three high-profile Republican governors and outspoken critics of Obamacare - have all decided to accept federal money to expand Medicaid coverage. The governor of New Jersey explained his reasoning yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Read more
Remembrances
2:04 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Remembering Classical Pianist Van Cliburn

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 2:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Tomorrow in this hour, we'll talk with Ron Elving about the looming automatic budget cuts. What questions do you have about the sequester? We'd especially like to hear from those of you who maybe affected. You can email questions to us now: talk@npr.org.

Read more
Business
2:04 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Presence Vs. Productivity: How Managers View Telecommuting

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 2:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The buzz has been building since the leak of an internal Yahoo memo last week on telecommuting. New Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer decided to end the company's work-from-home program. The memo, made public on the website AllThingsD, declares that communication and collaboration will be important, and that starts with physically being together.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:53 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Richard Thompson: The Acoustics Behind 'Electric'

Richard Thompson performs live at the All Things Considered studio.
Claire O'Neill NPR

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 6:03 pm

Guitar players will hear the pure, ringing tones conjured by 10 fingers that seem to be doing the work of 20 and say, "Oh, for sure — that's Richard Thompson."

Read more
Music Reviews
1:28 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

Aretha Franklin Before Atlantic: The Columbia Years

Aretha Franklin became a star on the Atlantic record label after leaving Columbia.
Express Newspapers Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 6:01 pm

Aretha Franklin made her first record when she was 14, singing some gospel standards in the church of her father, Rev. C.L. Franklin, an easygoing Detroit pastor who was friends with Martin Luther King and just about every gospel singer you could name. One of the stars who visited a lot was Sam Cooke, who convinced Aretha that she could be a hit singing popular music.

Read more

Pages