Africa
6:50 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Olympic Athlete Charged With Girlfriend's Murder

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 7:40 am

Oscar Pistorius has been charged with murder after his girlfriend was shot dead Thursday at his home in South Africa. Pistorius is the sprinter and double-amputee known as "Blade Runner."

6:42 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Men's Basketball Bowling Green 70 Western Michigan 60

Lead in text: 
Broncos have lost two straight, but remain tied for first in Mid-American Conference West Division.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
It was tough enough for the Western Michigan University basketball team to contain Bowling Green's dynamic duo of A'uston Calhoun and Jordon Crawford Wednesday night. The Broncos made things more difficult on themselves with turnovers and missed free throws. As a result, WMU suffered its second straight loss on the road, 70-60, at the Stroh Center in Bowling Green, Ohio.
6:31 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Pokagon Tribe, schools consider use of nicknames, mascots

Lead in text: 
State Department of Civil Rights has filed a complaint with federal Education Department asking for a ban on Indian nicknames and imagery.
DOWAGIAC - Consensus may be elusive among Pokagon Band Potawatomi when it comes to what they think about schools using Indian nicknames and mascots, a tribal spokeswoman said.
6:26 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Graduation rates drop for many Battle Creek area districts

Lead in text: 
Last year marked the first time since 2007 that statewide graduation rates matched those in the Battle Creek area. In other years, local rates have exceeded the state.
Tougher Michigan graduation requirements continued to challenge local schools last school year, with the local graduation rate falling and local dropout rate increasing even as the opposite was happening statewide. Across the 23 area school districts with high schools, 76 percent of the Class of 2012 graduated on time, according to data released Wednesday by the state.
6:16 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Kalamazoo Township police officer to be stationed at Kalamazoo Central High School

Lead in text: 
The township had an officer at the high school for years, but was cut in 2009 because of funding issues
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Kalamazoo Township Police Department will have an officer stationed at Kalamazoo Central High School starting in September 2013, Kalamazoo Public Schools announced Wednesday. The announcement said that the township and the school district will jointly fund the position.
NPR Story
5:49 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Clashes Mark Bahrain's 2nd Anniversary Of Uprising

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Two years ago today, more than 100,000 people rallied in the Gulf nation of Bahrain; a peacefully protest against the rule of their autocratic king. Despite harsh government repression, the protests continue. Many Bahrainis are critical of U.S. support for the country's monarch despite the growing popular opposition.

Independent producer Reese Erlich reports from Bahrain's capital, Manama.

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NPR Story
5:49 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Obama Tries To Move Spotlight Off Deficit Reduction

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Pre-school is one example of how President Obama says the government can play a constructive role in the U.S. economy. In his State of the Union speech, President Obama tried to refocus a debate that, for two years, has been all about cutting. The president is highlighting government programs that even many Republicans support.

Here's NPR's Scott Horsley.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: The U.S. economy is slowly recovering from the Great Recession, but President Obama says the government could be doing more to help.

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NPR Story
5:49 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Scientist Gets Research Donations From Crowd Funding

Vimeo

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 11:44 am

What do you do when you're a scientist and you have no job and no money for your research? If you're Ethan Perlstein, you try crowd funding. He raised $25,000 to investigate where the drug methamphetamine is stored in the brain.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Planet Money
3:09 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Mavericks, Hot Documents And Beer

Lawrence Jackson AP

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

The boards of American Airlines and US Airways just approved a merger of the two airlines. But the deal still has to win the approval of antitrust regulators at the Justice Department — regulators who last month sued to stop a merger between the beer giants Anheuser-Busch InBev and Grupo Modelo, which brews Corona.

The antitrust division has dozens of economists on staff. Their job, essentially, is to figure out whether a merger would reduce competition so much that a company could raise prices without losing business to competitors.

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All Tech Considered
3:06 am
Thu February 14, 2013

When It Comes To Fashion, Shouldn't There Be An App For That?

Fashion from designers like Oscar de la Renta were on display at Fashion Week in New York.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Thursday is the last day of New York Fashion Week, and some cutting-edge design will be presented in the tents at Lincoln Center — literally. Standing on the runway will be computer programmer types rather than models. This follows an event that kicked off Fashion Week — something called a "hackathon."

A hackathon, explains Liz Bacelar, is a "fast-paced competition in which graphic designers, software developers and people with ideas, they come together to build an app in 24 hours. "

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Law
3:04 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Drug Laws That Changed How We Punish

The Jan. 4, 1973, edition of the New York Daily News reports that Gov. Rockefeller's State of the State speech called for a life sentence for drug pushers.
New York Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

The United States puts more people behind bars than any other country, five times as many per capita compared with Britain or Spain.

It wasn't always like this. Half a century ago, relatively few people were locked up, and those inmates generally served short sentences. But 40 years ago, New York passed strict sentencing guidelines known as the "Rockefeller drug laws" — after their champion, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller — that put even low-level criminals behind bars for decades.

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Latin America
3:01 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Will 'Made In Haiti' Factories Improve Life In Haiti?

Workers prepare the foundation for a new warehouse and manufacturing facility at the Caracol Industrial Park in northern Haiti. The park, which opened last year, is still under construction.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Three years after the devastating Port-au-Prince earthquake, one of the largest international relief projects in Haiti isn't anywhere near where the quake hit. It's an industrial park on the north coast halfway between Cap-Haitien and the border with the Dominican Republic.

Aid agencies are pouring millions of dollars into the project to encourage people to move out of the overcrowded capital and create jobs. Critics, however, say the jobs don't pay enough to lift people out of poverty.

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NPR Story
9:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

AMR, US Airways To Announce Merger

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It appears the American Airlines and US Airways are going to merge. There are multiple reports that late today the boards of the two companies approved the merger, which will create the country's largest carrier. The deal, if it survives regulators' antitrust review, will allow American to emerge from bankruptcy.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn joins us from Dallas with more on the merger. And Wade, what will the airline be called and what else can you tell us about the makeup of the newly merged company?

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Movie Interviews
6:03 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Playing The Big Room: An Oscars Joke-Writer Reflects

Billy Crystal hosts the 84th Annual Academy Awards in 2012. Writing jokes for hosts is a tricky game, says longtime joke writer Dave Boone.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 3:45 pm

Hollywood's biggest night is in just a few weeks. People tend to focus on the glitz, the glamour and — of course — the gowns. But we thought we'd take a moment to focus on the gags.

Or rather what goes into writing both the jokes that fall flat and the jokes that soar. For a bit of Oscars Writing 101, NPR's All Things Considered turned to Dave Boone, who has written for the Academy Awards eight times.

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Tom Cole is an editor on NPR's Arts Desk. He develops, edits, produces, and reports on stories about art, culture, and music for NPR's news magazines Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and All Things Considered. Cole has held these responsibilities since February 1990.

Prior to his work with the Arts Desk, Cole worked for three and a half years as an associate producer for NPR's daily classical music program Performance Today, and also for Morning Edition, where he coordinated and edited news reports and produced music programming.

Music Interviews
5:23 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Bryan Ferry: A Forward-Looking Musician Turns To The Past

The Bryan Ferry Orchestra's new album is titled The Jazz Age.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Throughout his career, English musician Bryan Ferry has been one of popular music's most forward-looking performers. His band Roxy Music remodeled rock into an artsy, cosmopolitan sound in the early '70s and spearheaded the New Romantic style of the '80s.

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The Record
5:22 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Saving The Sounds Of America

A 16-inch lacquer disc, a format used in the 1930s, from the collection of the Library of Congress. Most of the lacquer, the part of the disc where the sound was etched, has been lost to decay.
Abby Brack Library of Congress

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 9:44 pm

We've been able to record sound for over 125 years, but many of the recordings that have been made in that time are in terrible shape. Many more, even recordings made in the past 10 years, are in danger because rapid technological changes have rendered their software obsolete. So Wednesday, the Library of Congress unveiled a plan to help preserve this country's audio archives.

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Music Reviews
4:45 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Jim James: On A Spiritual Quest In The Digital Age

Jim James' solo debut is titled Regions of Light and Sound of God.
Neil Krug Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 9:44 pm

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Business
4:34 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Airport Suites Offer Travelers A Place To Nap On The Fly

Minute Suite's 7-by-8-feet rooms offer Wi-Fi, a sofa bed, a television and a workspace. One traveler compared the small spaces to having an MRI done, but others say the idea is overdue at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.
Courtesy of Minute Suites

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 9:44 pm

When there's a big snowstorm or a plane has mechanical problems, airports often turn into uncomfortable holding pens, with people scrunched in chairs, lying on floors, filling up restaurants and otherwise trying to find something to do.

That's actually good news for one company. Minute Suites is building tiny airport retreats across the country. The suites are already operating in Atlanta and Philadelphia. Next up are Dallas-Fort Worth and Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

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Asia
4:29 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

How Do I Love Thee? Japanese Husbands Shout The Ways

A man shouts his love at an event in Tokyo on Jan. 29. The event comes two days ahead of Beloved Wives Day, a day on which husbands publicly scream their love for their wives before a crowd of onlookers. Husbands are also urged to head home early to express gratitude to their wives.
Kiyoshi Ota EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 9:44 pm

Standing in front of a giant heart made of pink tulips, businessman Yoshiharu Nishiguchi tells his wife — along with a bank of TV cameras and curious bystanders — that he is utterly devoted to her.

"Rieko, I love you!" he screams, before yielding the spotlight to the next nervous husband.

"Miwa!" the man belts out, "I love you!"

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Latin America
4:07 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Hungry For Energy, Brazil Builds Monster Dams In The Amazon

Construction continues at the Belo Monte dam complex in the Amazon basin in June 2012 near Altamira, Brazil. Belo Monte will be the world's third-largest hydroelectric project, and will displace up to 20,000 people living near the Xingu River.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 9:44 pm

Already Latin America's biggest economy, Brazil envisions a future requiring massive amounts of electrical power for its expanding industries and growing cities.

The response has been a construction boom that will install dozens of hydroelectric dams in the Amazon — and that's generating plenty of controversy, particularly from environmentalists.

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3:25 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

State legislators to vote on drunk driving limit

Lead in text: 
Members of Mothers Against Drunk Driving are trying to keep the Michigan drunk driving limit from increasing. The state lowered the limit to 0.08% ten years ago, but the law included a provision that would change the limit back to 0.10% this year.
LANSING - It's a no-brainer, say police, judges and Mothers Against Drunk Driving. They're advocating for the state to keep its drunken driving limit at 0.08% - which appears likely. But the Legislature has to take action before Oct. 1 or else the limit will return to 0.10%.
2:52 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Portage school billboard opponents get support

Lead in text: 
Because of public opposition, Adams Outdoor Advertising recently dropped a request to put a new billboard next to Angling Road Elementary near I-94.
PORTAGE, MI - Opponents of billboards proposed to be placed on Portage Public Schools properties have found support from the city of Portage. About 15 residents attended the Portage City Council meeting Tuesday to say they will continue to fight the remaining three billboards proposed by Adams Outdoor Advertising.
Dance
2:05 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Seniors have fun while tap dancing their way to health

The Time Steppers tap dancing at the senior center
Credit Nancy Camden

“You don’t even realize you are exercising,” one dancer offered. Another said, “My balance is better. My flexibility is better.” Bob Husser feels that a lot of people would like to tap dance but they’re afraid to try.

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Around the Nation
2:04 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Search For Ex-L.A. Cop May Be Over

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Bloodhounds, high-tech helicopters, a million-dollar reward and a thousand telephone tips, one of the largest searches in history to track down one man: Christopher Dorner. What's believed to be the body of the fugitive ex-L.A. police officer has been found amid the ruins of a cabin in Big Bear, California, where police finally chased him down.

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History
2:03 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

What's To Learn From King Richard III

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Last week, archeologists positively identified the remains of a skeleton found under a parking lot in Leicester as the earthly remains of Richard III, the last of the Plantagenet kings. Richard is best remembered as the hunchback, Shakespearean villain whose two-year reign ends when he's left stranded to face the enemy at the battle of Bosworth Field.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "RICHARD III")

SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER: (as King Richard III) A horse. A horse. My kingdom for a horse.

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Author Interviews
1:51 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

'Dead Sea Scrolls' Live On In Debate And Discovery

A part of the Isaiah Scroll, one of the Dead Sea Scrolls, is seen inside the vault of the Shrine of the Book building at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 4:42 pm

The Dead Sea Scrolls are the ancient manuscripts dating back to the time of Jesus that were found between 1947 and 1956 in caves by the Dead Sea. Since they were first discovered, they have been a source of fascination and debate over what they can teach — and have taught — about Judeo-Christian history. In his new book, The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography, Yale professor John J. Collins tells the story of the scrolls, their discovery and the controversies surrounding the scholarship of them.

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Politics
1:41 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Unpacking State of the Union Night Addresses

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The president speaks, Marco Rubio gulps, and Lindsey Graham slaps a hold on Hagel. It's Wednesday and time for a...

SENATOR LINDSEY GRAHAM: No confirmation without information...

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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From Our Listeners
1:38 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

World Radio Day: Share Your Story

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Today is World Radio Day, so designated by UNESCO to celebrate the key role this medium plays in organizing and informing communities. For much of their lives, your parents or maybe your grandparents looked at the world through the radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

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Music Reviews
12:27 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Rudresh Mahanthappa: Bicultural Jazz, Ever Shifting

Rudresh Mahanthappa.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 4:47 pm

Saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa's quartet can sound like it's cross-pollinating Indian classical music and vintage Captain Beefheart. That befits a bicultural saxophonist who grew up in Boulder, where his Hindu family had a Christmas tree. For a long time, Mahanthappa resisted combining jazz and Indian music — it was almost too obvious a trajectory. But then he got serious about it.

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