The Impact of War
2:13 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

War And Foreign Policy Through The Eyes Of Vietnam Veterans

During the Vietnam War, more than 58,000 Americans died, as well as more than 2 million Vietnamese soldiers and civilians.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 3:25 pm

Sen. John Kerry was confirmed Tuesday by the Senate to become the next secretary of state. Former Sen. Chuck Hagel awaits his turn before the Senate Armed Services Committee to become secretary of defense.

Both men are decorated Vietnam War veterans, and their critics and supporters point to their experiences in Vietnam as essential to their qualifications.

Hagel volunteered to serve in Vietnam and was wounded twice. Kerry commanded a swift boat in the Mekong Delta, and on his return home, he angrily threw away his decorations to protest the war.

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2:07 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Saugatuck City Council approves $5,000 for consolidation study

Lead in text: 
Saugatuck and Douglas are considering a merger of the two cities.
Douglas will deciew next week if it will contribute $5,000
From Our Listeners
2:07 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Letters: Inauguration, Memory Loss, National Geographic

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:39 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Thursday, and time to read from your comments. Last week, during the inauguration here in Washington, D.C., we asked listeners for a snapshot of their lives right now.

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Middle East
2:04 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

The Challenges To Democracy In Egypt

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Today, Egypt's defense minister warned that rising conflicts and chaos in the country could result in the collapse of the state and that it poses a threat to the future of coming generations, this after days of violent anti-government protests and demonstrations in cities across Egypt, including Cairo, the capital, and Port Said, just north of the Suez Canal.

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2:00 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Senate Majority Leader cool to electoral college change

Lead in text: 
Bill was introduced in 2012, but not acted on. It would award most electoral votes by Congressional district.
Lansing - Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville said Tuesday he doesn't necessarily agree with a proposal to change the rule under which Michigan awards its 16 electoral votes to the presidential candidate winning the popular-vote majority. Rep.
Latin America
1:21 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

For Your Next Caribbean Vacation, Haiti ... Maybe?

Mont Joli Hotel looks out over Cap-Haitian in northern Haiti. The owner says he's usually fully booked and plans to double the hotel's capacity. Haiti is trying to expand its tourism infrastructure and tap in to the multibillion-dollar Caribbean travel market.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 2:29 pm

Haiti used to be a tourist hot spot in the Caribbean. Former U.S. President Bill Clinton regularly recounts how he and Hillary honeymooned in Haiti in 1975. There used to be a hopping Club Med just outside Port-au-Prince, but it closed in the '90s.

Now, the Haitian government is trying to revive some of its former allure, launching an aggressive campaign to market the poorest country in the hemisphere as a vacation hub.

President Michel Martelly says tourism could be a major driver of economic growth and could help lift Haitians out of poverty.

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Cara Lieurance
12:36 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Behind the scenes of Les Miserables

Peter Lockyer and Lawrence Goldberg
Credit Cara Lieurance

Cara Lieurance interviews Peter Lockyer and Lawrence Goldberg.

Les Miserables music director Lawrence Goldberg and Peter Lockyer, who plays Jean Valjean, trade behind-the-scenes stories of performing in the longest-running musical in history. They also share insights into the contrast between the show’s live production and the recent film. 

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Education
12:08 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Topping College Graduate Rates, Is It Worth It?

President Obama wants the nation to produce 8 million more college graduates by the year 2020. But can it be done, and how much would it cost? Host Michel Martin puts those questions to Anthony Carnevale, Director and Research Professor of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Your Money
12:08 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Retirement Accounts: Don't Rob Peter To Pay Paul!

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 12:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, we have the latest installment in our series Social Me. We'll talk about how educators could use their students' social media habits to figure out how they learn.

But first, to matters of personal finance: We want to talk about retirement. While earlier generations might have had a pension, now millions of Americans, if they have any savings, probably have some kind of retirement account like a 401K.

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NPR Story
11:44 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Connecting To Kids, Via Their Digital Language

What if your child's internet cruising could have a valuable use — helping educators tailor lesson plans in school? Social media expert Rey Junco tells host Michel Martin about a potentially revolutionary educational tool, in Tell Me More's new series 'Social Me.'

NPR Story
11:44 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Social Media: OMG! Do Parents Get It?

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 12:13 pm

From tablets and iPhones to Twitter and Instagram, technology is changing the way children interact with the world. Host Michel Martin talks with a roundtable of parents about encouraging digital exploration, while keeping kids safe.

8:01 am
Tue January 29, 2013

State Superintendent calls for big raises for teachers

Lead in text: 
Michael Flanagan says increasing academic standards won't do much good without qualified math and science teachers
State Superintendent Mike Flanagan wants teachers to get a big pay boost. Flanagan, speaking before science experts at Michigan State University today, called on teachers in Michigan to make $100,000-plus salaries to attract more mathematicians and scientists into teaching, according to a news release from the Michigan Department of Education.
7:33 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Former State Supreme Court Justice due in court Tuesday

Lead in text: 
Diane Hathaway resigned from the state's highest court earlier this month.
Former Supreme Court Justice Diane Hathaway is to get her day in court today. After 20 years on the Wayne County and Supreme Court benches, Hathaway is scheduled to stand before a federal judge at 10:30 a.m. in Ann Arbor and is expected to plead guilty to a felony bank fraud charge.
Around the Nation
7:25 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Virginia To Repeal 'Living In Sin' Law

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:12 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Two Is A Coincidence, Three Is A Trend

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Two is a coincidence. Three is a trend. That's why an Oklahoma City house has been dubbed The Twin House, after a third consecutive couple living there had twins - a boy and a girl each. Current tenants, Brady and Chelsea Smith, said they didn't believe in the twin mojo when they moved in. Then an ultrasound showed she was expecting twins. New father Brady Smith told the Oklahoman, now his friends won't even drive down the block.

6:55 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Waterfront Film Festival office opens in South Haven

Lead in text: 
This year will be the first that festival is held in South Haven. Saugatuck had been home to Waterfront Film Festival since 1999.
SOUTH HAVEN - Organizers want to be ready when an estimated 16,000 and film fans and filmmakers converge on South Haven for the 2013 WaterFront Film Festival.
6:41 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Report says dune in South Haven should be stabilized to develop property

Lead in text: 
Stabilizing the dune could be "intensive and expensive" effort.
SOUTH HAVEN - The large dune dominating the Syndicate Park subdivision in South Haven Township must be stabilized if the property is to reach its potential, according to a report.
6:29 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Snyder seeks ruling from Michigan Supreme Court on "Right to Work"

Lead in text: 
Court could rule on state civil service workers and exemption for police and firefighters.
Opponents of the state's new right-to-work law promised a challenge of the controversial bill that passed the lame-duck Legislature in December. But those challenges may become a moot point since Gov. Rick Snyder asked the Michigan Supreme Court on Monday to review the bill and determine whether it passes constitutional muster.
6:21 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Portage School officials question whether Human Resources Director was consulting on district time

Lead in text: 
Patricia Koeze resigned earlier this month after it was discovered she had taken a job with a charter school in Muskegon. She's also involved in the controversy that led to former Portage Superintendent Ric Perry's resignation.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- Officials at Portage Public Schools say they were not aware that Patricia Koeze, who resigned as the district's human resources director on Jan. 21, had been working since June as a $2,000-a-month consultant for WayPoint Academy, a Muskegon charter school. "We were not aware of that at all," said Rob Olsen, Portage's acting superintendent.
NPR Story
5:05 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Sen. Flake Comments On Immigration Overhaul

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

An immigration plan announced Monday by a bipartisan group of senators would create a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country and overhaul legal immigration. It also calls for improved border security and better tracking of individuals in the U.S. on visas. Steve Inskeep talks with one of the senators behind the plan, Republican Jeff Flake from Arizona.

NPR Story
5:05 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Timbuktu Freed From Rebel Occupation

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The city of Timbuktu is free...

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Mali, Mali, Mali, Mali...

INSKEEP: ...and residents cheered as French and Malian forces entered the city. Those forces swept aside Islamist rebels who'd controlled the place for months. The Islamists rule included amputations and the destroyed ancient tombs. It ended with the burning of a library housing priceless manuscripts.

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Law
4:03 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Armed 'Good Guys' And The Realities Of Facing A Gunman

The NRA and some concealed-carry activists say the best defense against gun violence is armed "good guys." Here, a man fires his pistol at an indoor range in Aurora, Colo., last summer.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:18 pm

As the nation ponders how to stop the next mass shooting, the gun rights movement offers a straight-forward formula, laid out famously by NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre.

"The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," LaPierre said last month, as his group responded to the elementary school massacre in Newtown, Conn.

One Man's Story

In Washington state, one such "good guy" — a private citizen who drew his gun in defense of others — paid a heavy price.

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The Record
3:40 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Rising Postal Rates Squeeze Small Record Labels

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 10:51 am

Prices on mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service increased this week — the price of a first-class stamp now costs 46 cents, up a penny. But for small businesses that ship products overseas, like many independent record labels, the costs could be much larger.

Brian Lowit, who has worked at Washington, D.C.'s Dischord Records for 10 years, says that while a postage rate hike is a familiar bump in the road, "I've never seen one this drastic."

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Research News
3:38 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Bird, Plane, Bacteria? Microbes Thrive In Storm Clouds

The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean, seen from a NASA research aircraft on Aug. 30, 2010. This flight through the eyewall caught Earl just as it was intensifying from a Category 2 to a Category 4 hurricane. Researchers collected air samples on this flight from about 30,000 feet over both land and sea and close to 100 different species of bacteria.
Jane Peterson NASA

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

Microbes are known to be able to thrive in extreme environments, from inside fiery volcanoes to down on the bottom of the ocean. Now scientists have found a surprising number of them living in storm clouds tens of thousands of feet above the Earth. And those airborne microbes could play a role in global climate.

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Poetry
3:36 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Rare Robert Frost Collection Surfaces 50 Years After His Death

American poet Robert Frost, shown here in 1955, died on Jan. 29, 1963. Now, 50 years after his death, a rare collection of letters, audio and photographs sheds new light on his religious beliefs.
AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

Tuesday marks the 50th anniversary of the death of the poet Robert Frost, famous for such poems as "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "The Road Not Taken." Fans of Frost's works have another reason to pay special attention to his legacy this week: Jonathan Reichert, professor emeritus at the State University of New York at Buffalo, has just donated a rare collection of Frost materials to the university.

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Africa
3:32 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Tunisia's Salafis: 'A Danger' Or Preachers Of God's Law?

A demonstrator shouts anti-government slogans as he stands in front of the Justice Ministry in the Tunisian capital, Tunis, on Nov. 6, 2012, as part of a demonstration by radical Salafi Muslims protesting against the imprisonment of hundreds of Salafist militants.
Amine Landoulsi AP

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 8:36 am

The uprisings of the Arab Spring unleashed a new political force in the region — Salafis, ultraconservative Muslims who aspire to a society ruled entirely by a rigid form of Islamic law. Their models are the salaf, or ancestors, referring to the earliest Muslims who lived during the lifetime of the Prophet Muhammad.

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Lexington native Brenna Angel anchored local morning newscasts for WUKY through May 13. She joined the station in March 2010 after previously working for WHAS-AM in Louisville.

Her work has been honored by the Hearst Foundation, the Radio Television Digital News Association, and the Associated Press. Several of Brenna’s stories have aired on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Brenna accepted a position with the Lexington Mayor's Office in May 2013.

Around the Nation
6:23 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Unbridled Kentuckians Decide It's Time For A Kick-Ass New Slogan

Whit Hiler (left) and Griffin VanMeter are spearheading the campaign to change Kentucky's slogan from Unbridled Spirit to Kentucky Kicks Ass.
KentuckyForKentucky

Kentucky is known for horse racing, bourbon and college basketball. And if a couple of creative advertising professionals have any say in the matter, the Bluegrass State will be world renowned for something else.

They want the state to replace its current slogan, Unbridled Spirit, with a new one — Kentucky Kicks Ass.

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Theatre
5:46 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Musical based on playwright's relationship with maid during the Civil Rights Movement

Credit WMU Theatre

A preview of the musical

The musical Caroline or Change by Tony Kushner is being staged in only one theatre in the country this year, the University Theatre at WMU. Caroline or Change is Kushner’s semi-autobiographical look back at his childhood.

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Music
5:42 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Hymn composer to lead 'Big Sing,' spiritual retreat

John Bell at the Clifton Diocese in the United Kingdom
Credit Clifton Diocese

Hear from Reverend John Bell

John Bell is famous as a Scottish composer of modern-day hymns for worship and as a BBC radio commentator. He is also in demand as a leader of spiritual retreats and community music-making. On February 10th at First Presbyterian Church in Kalamazoo, he'll lead a free, public "Big Sing,” co-sponsored by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Music. 

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