Shots - Health News
2:16 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Alzheimer's Drug Dials Back Deafness In Mice

If you know some mice that took This Is Spinal Tap too literally, they might want to know about an experiment to restore hearing with a failed Alzheimer's drug.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:34 am

If you've spent years CRANKING YOUR MUSIC UP TO 11, this item's for you.

A drug developed for Alzheimer's disease can partially reverse hearing loss caused by exposure to extremely loud sounds, an international team reports in the journal Neuron.

Before you go back to rocking the house with your Van Halen collection, though, consider that the drug has only been tried in mice so far. And it has never been approved for human use.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

How Nixon Re-Shaped The Presidency

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 2:55 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee.

But it is a special day. On this day, 100 years ago, Richard Milhous Nixon was born in Yorba Linda, California. He later became a U.S. representative, a senator, a vice president, and finally, 37th president of the United States. From civil rights to Watergate, Nixon's term shaped perceptions of the modern office of the presidency and creating quite a few memorable soundbites in the process.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Sock it to me

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin recaps the week in politics

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 5:17 pm

NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin recaps the week in politics — from Chuck Hagel's nomination for Secretary of Defense, to the swearing-in of the 113th Congress. Exiting Rep. Steve LaTourette (R-OH) shares his thoughts on the current state and future of the Republican Party.

NPR Story
2:05 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

When Coaches Risk A Player's Health For A Win

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 5:17 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Theater
12:25 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Bobby Cannavale, At Home On Broadway

Bobby Cannavale (right) stars in Glengarry Glen Ross on Broadway. Cannavale has also starred in television shows such as HBO's Boardwalk Empire and in films such as The Station Agent.
Scott Landis JRA Broadway

Bobby Cannavale may have acted in film and on television, but at heart, he's a theater guy. Always has been, always will be.

Last season he starred as Gyp Rosetti on the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. He's currently on Broadway opposite Al Pacino in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross -- but the stage has been his calling since he was a kid growing up in Union City, N.J.

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12:17 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Michigan Court of Appeals upholds benefits for live-in partners of state workers

Lead in text: 
The Michigan Civil Service Commission has offered benefits to all unmarried domestic partners. Ruling could be appealed to Michigan Supreme Court.
LANSING, MI - Domestic partners of state employees are entitled to health care benefits, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled. A three-judge Court of Appeals panel on Tuesday ruled 2-1 in favor of the Michigan Civil Service Commission's decision to offer the State Health Plan to "other eligible adult individuals" who have lived with state employees for at least a year.
12:14 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

University of Michigan Marching Band Director to be Western Michigan University Director of Bands

Lead in text: 
Western Michigan University Graduate Scott Boerma will replace the retiring Robert Spradling.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Western Michigan University officials say they're thrilled to welcome respected conductor, composer and arranger Scott Boerma back to campus. Boerma, a WMU alumnus, is leaving his position as University of Michigan's marching band director to become Western Michigan University 's Director of Bands beginning fall 2013.
NPR Story
11:53 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Ravens' Ayanbadejo Digs 'Call Me Maybe'

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 12:05 pm

It's playoff season in the NFL. As part of Tell Me More's 'In Your Ear' series, the Baltimore Ravens' Brendon Ayanbadejo shares some of the songs that keep him motivated on and off the field.

NPR Story
11:53 am
Wed January 9, 2013

What The Emancipation Proclamation Didn't Do

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 12:11 pm

The Emancipation Proclamation celebrates its 150th anniversary this year. But not everyone knows the real story behind the document. Host Michel Martin speaks with historian Lonnie Bunch, about what the Emancipation Proclamation did - and didn't do.

NPR Story
11:53 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Beauty Shop Fodder: Cabinet Picks And Reality TV

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 12:13 pm

The Beauty Shop ladies weigh in on President Obama's national security nominations. They also talk about whether reality television has sunk to a new low this season with shows about rural partying and baby mamas.

Federal budget
11:10 am
Wed January 9, 2013

With "fiscal cliff" deal done, Upton says focus now on debt ceiling and tax reform

Fred Upton - file photo
Credit WMUK

West Michigan Congressman Fred Upton he would have preferred “a grand bargain” rather than the deal reached last week that averted the “fiscal cliff.” But Upton voted for the agreement, in part, because it brings certainty in the tax code. He says it’s the first of a three step process. 

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Ken Tucker reviews rock, country, hip-hop and pop music for Fresh Air. He is a cultural critic who has been the editor-at-large at Entertainment Weekly, and a film critic for New York Magazine. His work has won two National Magazine Awards and two ASCAP-Deems Taylor Awards. He has written book reviews for The New York Times Book Review and other publications.

Tucker is the author of Scarface Nation: The Ultimate Gangster Movie and Kissing Bill O'Reilly, Roasting Miss Piggy: 100 Things to Love and Hate About Television.

Music Reviews
10:54 am
Wed January 9, 2013

'Nashville' Soundtrack Stands On Its Own

Connie Britton (pictured) and Hayden Panetierre star as country singers of different generations on the ABC series Nashville.
Courtesy of ABC

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 2:08 pm

"Telescope," the fictional hit single by the fictional country star Juliette Barnes on Nashville, is sung by the actress who plays Juliette, Hayden Panetierre. If it didn't become a real-life hit when the song was released a few months ago to country radio stations, it wasn't for lack of catchiness, courtesy of producers T-Bone Burnett and Buddy Miller.

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Economy
8:58 am
Wed January 9, 2013

New report shows Southwest Michigan's economy slowed in December

Brian Long
Credit Grand Valley State University

A new report on Southwest Michigan’s economy finds growth slowed in December. The director of Grand Valley State University’s Supply Chain Management Program Brian Long finds economic indicators were down in the region, compared to November. 

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Urban sprawl
8:50 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Michigan's debate over controlling sprawl

Credit Michigan Now

When he was running for governor, Rick Snyder had a ten-point plan to “Reinvent Michigan”. Point number five was: “Restoring cities and controlling urban sprawl”. Snyder came to the annual Michigan Farm Bureau dinner recently at DeVos Place in Grand Rapids. Michigan Now’s Chris McCarus was there too.

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Around the Nation
7:19 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Root Canals Are More Popular Than Congress

Polling found Congress' most recent approval rating is 9 percent. Other things were tested too, and it was discovered root canals are more popular than lawmakers. On the bright side for Congress, it is more popular than the Ebola virus and playground bullies.

Around the Nation
7:10 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Principal Wants To Be Up On The Roof

Students of Don Gillett at Wrightsville Elementary in York., Pa., are in a program tracking books they read. If they total 2,000, he says he'll get a tent and a grill, and live on the roof for awhile.

Poetry
6:26 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Richard Blanco Will Be First Latino Inaugural Poet

Poet Richard Blanco is the author of City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to the Beach of the Dead and Looking for the Gulf Motel.
Nico Tucci Courtesy Richard Blanco

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 3:44 pm

In 1961, Robert Frost became the first poet to read at a U.S. inauguration when he recited "The Gift Outright" at President John F. Kennedy's swearing in. Since then, only three other poets have taken part in subsequent inaugural ceremonies: Maya Angelou, Miller Williams and Elizabeth Alexander. Now, there's a fifth.

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Clay Masters joined the Iowa Public Radio newsroom as a correspondent in 2012.  He covers the statehouse when the legislature is in session, and reports on a variety of topics the rest of the year. Clay is an award-winning multi-media journalist whose radio stories have been heard on various NPR and American Public Media programs. His television documentaries have aired on PBS stations across the country. He’s also a regular contributor to NPR’s arts desk, covering indie music news.

Clay is a Nebraska native and worked for Nebraska Public Radio and Television (NET) before coming to IPR. He was one of the founding reporters of Harvest Public Media, the CPB-funded Local Journalism project covering agriculture in the Midwest.

Business
4:46 am
Wed January 9, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 7:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is Psyper Bowl.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GANGNAM STYLE")

PSY: Oppan Gangnam style. Gangnam style. Op op op op oppan Gangnam Style.

MONTAGNE: South Korean pop star Psy took YouTube by storm with the viral sensation "Gangnam Style." Now he's setting his sights on the Super Bowl.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:46 am
Wed January 9, 2013

NRA Vows To Stop Tuscon From Destroying Guns

Guns are piled inside a crate outside a police station in Tucson, Ariz., on Tuesday during a buyback. Tuesday marked the second anniversary of when a gunman opened fire on former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as she met with constituents in 2011, killing six people and leaving 12 others injured.
Brian Skoloff AP

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 1:14 pm

Former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and her husband, Mark Kelly, have formed a political action committee to support prevention of gun violence. The announcement came Tuesday, the second anniversary of the mass shooting in Tucson that left six dead and wounded 13, including Giffords.

Churches and fire stations around the city rang bells in memory of the victims and in commemoration of other mass shootings since Tucson.

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Business
4:46 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Mississippi River Level Disrupts Supply Chain

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning.

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It's All Politics
3:32 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Lobbying Battle Over Hagel Under Way Before Obama's Nod

Former U.S. Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., speaks at the White House on Monday after President Obama nominated him to replace Defense Secretary Leon Panetta.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 9:03 am

Weeks before President Obama officially nominated Chuck Hagel to be secretary of defense, the lobbying battle was well under way. The fight might be bigger than any other Cabinet nomination in history as the former Republican senator's friends and foes prepare for modern combat on TV and the Internet.

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Education
3:31 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Elite Colleges Struggle To Recruit Smart, Low-Income Kids

Top schools like Harvard, seen here in 2000, often offer scholarships and other financial incentives, but they are finding it hard to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:26 am

Across the United States, college administrators are poring over student essays, recommendation letters and SAT scores as they select a freshman class for the fall.

If this is like most years, administrators at top schools such as Harvard and Stanford will try hard to find talented high school students from poor families in a push to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus and to counter the growing concern that highly selective colleges cater mainly to students from privileged backgrounds.

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Law
3:31 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Can Police Force Drunken Driving Suspects To Take Blood Tests?

A photographic screen hangs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, which is undergoing renovations. On Wednesday, the justices will hear arguments in a case that asks whether police without a warrant can administer a blood test to a suspected drunken driver.
Greg E. Mathieson MAI/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 1:32 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether police must get a warrant before forcing a drunken driving suspect to have his blood drawn.

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The Salt
6:52 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Farm Bill Critics Claim Partial Victory Despite Stalemate

Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011.
Robert Willett MCT /Landov

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 10:20 am

It's amazing how many different kinds of people have been trying to abolish or at least change the government's payments to farmers. They include economists, environmentalists, taxpayer advocates, global anti-hunger advocates and even a lot of farmers. Some have been fighting farm subsidies for the past 20 years.

This past year, those critics laid siege to offices on Capitol Hill because the law that authorizes these programs — the farm bill — was about to expire. (It has to be renewed every five years.)

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Environment
6:34 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Deep In Canadian Lakes, Signs Of Tar Sands Pollution

The Shell Oil Jackpine open pit mine uses trucks that are 3 stories tall, weigh 1 million pounds and cost $7 million each. There is explosive growth in the oil field areas around Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:43 pm

Canadian researchers have used the mud at the bottom of lakes like a time machine to show that tar sands oil production in Alberta, Canada, is polluting remote regional lakes as far as 50 miles from the operations.

An increasingly large share of U.S. oil comes from Canada's tar sands. There are environmental consequences of this development, but until recently, Canadian regional and federal governments left it to the industry to monitor these effects.

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Business
6:33 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

After The 'Fiscal Cliff,' Businesses Say Some Uncertainty Remains

U.S. employers added 155,000 jobs in December, a steady gain that shows hiring held up during the tense negotiations to resolve the fiscal cliff. But the unemployment rate remained at 7.8 percent last month.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 7:23 pm

Businesses complained that the uncertainty surrounding the "fiscal cliff" froze their decisions about hiring and expanding, which hurt the economy. Washington has now managed half a deal, which settles tax issues, at least for the time being. But has that removed enough uncertainty to boost some business hiring and investment?

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Middle East
5:20 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

A Welcoming Way Station For Syrians Fleeing Home

Beit Qamishlo is a modest house in southern Turkey that caters to Syrian exiles seeking temporary refuge. It also hosts frequent discussions on Syria's future. Here, Malik Dagestani (center), a former political prisoner in Syria, talks about his detention in the 1980s and 1990s.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:37 pm

It's called Beit Qamishlo, or the House of Qamishlo. It's named after a city in northeastern Syria, though the house isn't even in Syria — it's just across the border in southern Turkey.

The house is humble, made of concrete blocks, with tile floors. Arabic slogans are taped on the walls: "Beit Qamishlo is a house for everyone," "It's a window to Syria's future," "Under one roof we plant life together and freedom."

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Europe
5:19 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

A Dash Of Olive Oil May Preserve British Cathedral

The stones of York Minster in northern England are decaying. Olive oil may be just the dressing the cathedral needs to preserve its Gothic architecture.
Nigel Roddis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:24 am

The British have some stunning cathedrals, and York Minster, in the north of England, is one of the most magnificent of all.

Construction on it began 800 years ago, and a mere 2 1/2 centuries later, work was complete.

The result was one of Europe's largest Gothic cathedrals and one that's had a rough ride through history: It's been pillaged and looted, and damaged by devastating fires and lightning strikes.

Today, there's another threat: acid rain. As a result, the cathedral's stones are decaying.

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