Iraq
5:56 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

The Iraq War: 10 Years Later, Where Do We Stand?

Traffic drives through Tahrir Square in central Baghdad on Wednesday. Ten years after the start of the war, bullet holes still mark buildings, and towers wrecked by U.S. missiles and tank shells have not been fully rebuilt.
Hadi Mizban AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:32 am

Ten years ago this Tuesday, the U.S. invaded Iraq, and by any count — and there have been many — the toll has been devastating.

So far, about 4,400 U.S. troops and more than 100,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed, and the combined costs of the war come to an astounding $2 trillion, including future commitments like veteran care.

So where do we stand today?

Stephen Hadley was the national security adviser under President George W. Bush from 2005 to 2009, and part of the White House team that helped sell the war to the public.

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Politics
5:03 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

Annual Conservative Gathering Questions GOP's Direction

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:32 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Jacki Lyden.

As we just heard, longtime Republican Senator Rob Portman's position on gay marriage has evolved. Of course, gay marriage is one of the social issues that was front and center at this week's Conservative Political Action Conference, otherwise known as CPAC. It's the annual gathering of the most conservative wing of the Republican Party.

NPR's national political correspondent Don Gonyea has been at CPAC, and he joins me now. Hi there, Don.

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Music Interviews
4:31 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

Kacey Musgraves, Country Music's New 'Golden' Girl

Kacey Musgraves' new album is titled Same Trailer Different Park.
Kelly Christine Musgraves Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:32 am

"I'm all about small towns," Kacey Musgraves says. "I think it's a great place to grow up. But I think it might be a little more comforting to some people to hear it from a real perspective, instead of one that tries to sweep things under the rug."

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Sports
4:16 pm
Sat March 16, 2013

From Tweeting To Meeting Lance Armstrong

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong invited sportswriter Michael McCann to his Texas home for a three-hour interview.
Nathalie Magniez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 10:34 am

Writer Michael McCann is a legal analyst for Sports Illustrated. He's been covering Lance Armstrong's legal issues for the past year, following the allegations that Armstrong doped and used performance-enhancing drugs.

McCann regularly responds to readers' questions on Twitter, too. About a month ago, he tells All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden, he had a new follower: @LanceArmstrong. It was the former cycling champion himself.

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Adrian Younge, 'Frankenstein's Cat' And Tegan And Sara

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:30 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Sports
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Bright Beginnings, Sad Endings In Sports News

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: Spring has sprung with a doubleheader of baseball - spring training and the World Baseball Classic. Nothing classic, though, about the defeat of the U.S. team last night by Puerto Rico. They were eliminated but doesn't really matter. The Miami Heat continue the streak while a college team does too, just in the opposite direction. We're joined now from Sedona, Arizona by Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine. Good morning, Howard.

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Middle East
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

Reading The Tea Leaves Of Obama's Mideast Trip

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Politics
5:14 am
Sat March 16, 2013

What's Changed: From Brady Bill To Current Gun Control Push

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Sarah Brady has worked for tougher gun laws for decades. Her husband, Jim Brady, was shot in the head by John Hinckley when he attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan. Jim Brady was President Reagan's press secretary and has lived with a disability ever since. The Bradys founded the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which worked to pass a law that now bears their name, the Brady Bill.

And Sarah Brady joins us from her home in Virginia. Ms. Brady, thanks very for being with us.

SARAH BRADY: Thank you for having me.

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Movie Interviews
4:03 am
Sat March 16, 2013

'Leviathan': The Fishing Life, From 360 Degrees

The noisy film is mostly wordless, with animals and nature filling in the blanks between its strangely stark images.
The Cinema Guild

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 7:46 am

Leviathan is a documentary — and yet not a documentary. It's a near-wordless, almost abstract depiction of an 80-foot groundfishing boat heading out of New Bedford, Mass. The film's unusual structure and point of view has gotten rave reviews at festivals and from many critics.

Sometimes you don't know quite what you're seeing and listening to in Leviathan. You hear metal groaning and rasping, see fish, gloves and tools tossed about on a boat that's pitching and rolling in a roaring wind.

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Local Music
5:54 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Soovin Kim, David Colson on 'A Soldier's Tale'

Soovin Kim

A WWII draftee faces death by firing squad for desertion. He'll be allowed to live if he serves out the rest of the war. That's the extreme situation dealt with in "A Soldier's Tale," a unique stage piece of narration, dance, and music featuring a 1918 score by Igor Stravinsky and updated, modern (sometimes vulgar) text by Kurt Vonnegut. 

A collaboration between Fontana Chamber Arts and the WMU School of Music, it will receive performances in the Dalton Center Multi-Media Room Friday and Saturday.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank, but first it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. You can always click the contact us link on our website waitwait.npr.org.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:29 am

More questions for the panel: Speaking In Tongues, The Curse of Lipitor's Tomb, and Broad Appeal.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:41 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Who's Carl This Time?

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 10:29 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Aww. Thanks, Carl. Thanks everybody. We got a great show for you today. We got Huey Lewis of Huey Lewis and the News. He'll be joining us later to play our game. But first, before we get started, Carl, let me say it is great to have you back.

KASELL: Thank you, Peter, good to be back.

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

The Man Who Coined 'The God Particle' Explains: It Was A Joke!

This is what researchers at the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider expect a Higgs boson to look like. The Higgs boson is the subatomic particle that scientists say gives everything in the universe mass.
ATLAS Experiment/CERN

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:02 pm

We've explained it many times: Physicists are irked when we in the media call the Higgs Boson, "The God Particle."

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Music News
5:26 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

The 'Singing Sound' Of Saxophonist Charles Lloyd

Charles Lloyd, 75, continues to tour widely.
Dorothy Darr ECM Records

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:31 pm

Charles Lloyd has a way of talking that sounds a lot like the notes from his saxophone: full of youthful energy, yet packed with experiences reserved for grownups.

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Book Reviews
5:26 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Book Review: 'Where Tigers Are At Home'

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:05 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Our book reviewer, Alan Cheuse, has just traveled to Brazil and back in an 800-page novel. The book is called "Where Tigers Are At Home." It's by a French novelist named Jean-Marie Blas de Robles and it's just out in English. Here's Alan's review.

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Local Music
4:45 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

'Prelude to Spring' set for Sunday

Singers in the Kalamazoo Children's Chorus
Credit Kalamazoo Children's Chorus

The Kalamazoo Children's Chorus returns to Chenery Auditorium this Sunday for a concert called 'A Prelude to Spring.'  

Fred Sang describes the program, and gives us a glimpse into the multi-leveled ensemble, which includes the Treble Choir, Bel Canto, the Preparatory Choir, the Concert Choir and the Touring Choir. He also describes a renaissance in vocal music in the last 20 years, which has provided choirs at all levels the chance to perform excellent, meaningful works. We also hear about the Touring Choir's upcoming trip to Italy in June of 2013.

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Asia
3:23 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

From Police Chief To Political Office, Jobs Are For Sale In China

The 12th National People's Congress holds the election for its new president at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:15 pm

China's new president, Xi Jinping, who was formally elected Thursday, is already engaged in his own anti-corruption campaign, threatening to go after the key players — the tigers as well as the flies.

Confronting the issue is a matter of political self-interest and survival for China's new leaders. The problem is how to root out corrupt officials when so many are quite literally invested in the system.

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Movie Reviews
11:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Three New Films Examine What It Means When Girls Act Out

Ginger & Rosa (starring Alice Englert and Elle Fanning) was directed by Sally Potter, who is perhaps best known for her 1992 film Orlando.
Sally Potter

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 5:37 pm

In the '60s, some fervent rock groupies formed a band called the GTOs — short for "Girls Together Outrageously" — and while it didn't last, the name captures the impulse behind stories in which women chafe against the male-centric society that pulls their strings. This week you can see a girls-together-outrageously triple bill: Spring Breakers, Ginger & Rosa and Beyond the Hills.

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NPR Story
11:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

'Bones' Inspires A New Generation Of Crime Fighters

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:03 pm

Kathy Reichs, the writer and scientist behind the TV show Bones, is back with a new novel for young adults. Code: A Virals Novel stars Tory Brennan, great-niece of Reich's famed crime-solving heroine Tempe Brennan. Reichs discusses the book, co-written with Brendan Reichs.

NPR Story
11:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Improving Healthcare, One Search At A Time

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. We've all been there, sitting at the computer late at night, clicking on those websites that offer medical opinions, trying to convince ourselves that our headache must be caused by a brain tumor, right? Yeah, that dry skin you've had for the last couple of months, of course it's due to a thyroid disorder because that's what you're finding out on the Web. Recognize yourself?

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NPR Story
11:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Curiosity Hits Paydirt: New Clues To Life On Mars

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:03 pm

Microbes may once have happily existed on the surface of Mars, according to chemical analysis of a sedimentary rock in the Red Planet's Gale crater. NASA geologist and exobiologist David Blake discusses evidence for an ancient freshwater lake in the crater, and describes the mineral-chomping microbes that may have thrived there.

WMUK News
11:30 am
Fri March 15, 2013

WMU hosts state energy forum

Michigan high-tension power lines (file photo)
Credit AP Photo

The future of energy in Michigan – how it is used and produced – will be the focus of a forum in Kalamazoo on Monday, March 18th, from 1 to 5 p.m. at Western Michigan University’s Fetzer Center. It’s the fourth in a series of seven public meetings around the state sponsored by the Michigan Public Service Commission and the state’s Energy Office.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do You Really Know Who's Behind Bars?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 11:52 am

There's been a dramatic shift in the racial makeup of America's prison inmates, especially female inmates. To find out why, host Michel Martin talks with Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer, and author Patrice Gaines, who has worked with women in prison for more than 20 years. They say changes in drug crime enforcement, sentencing laws, and the economic downturn all played a role.

NPR Story
11:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CPAC Goes To Washington: Can They Rally And Rebuild?

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, you might've been following the long debate over whether this country locks up too many people for too little reason and for too long. It turns out something else interesting is happening that you might not heard about - the racial breakdown of the prison population is changing. More white people, especially more white women, are getting locked up. And we'll find out more about that in a few minutes.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Will Pope Francis Answer Muslims' Prayers, Too?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 4:15 pm

Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for a fresh cut on the week's news, including the new pope and college basketball's March Madness. Martin is joined by culture critic Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Pablo Torre and Reverend Leo Patalinghug.

Movie Interviews
10:35 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Paul Thomas Anderson, The Man Behind 'The Master'

Navy veteran Freddie (Phoenix) falls under the influence of cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in Anderson's film, which critic Ella Taylor describes as "one of the most twisted father-son tales ever told."
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 11:52 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 2, 2012.

For Paul Thomas Anderson, moviemaking is not just an art; it's also about time management.

"At its best, a film set is when everybody knows what's going on and everybody's working together," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "At its worst, [it's] when something's been lost in communication and an actor's not sure how many shots are left or what's going on, and the makeup department's confused."

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Southwest Michigan economy
10:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Upjohn Institute report predicts modest job growth in Southwest Michigan over two years

Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
Credit WMUK

A new report predicts improved private-sector employment growth in West Michigan for 2013 and 2014. 

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9:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

KPS Superintendent Rice calls for state to "substantially" increase investment in children

Rice says he wants people to see spending on education and support services as a moral issue to ensure all children have an equal opportunity in life.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Kalamazoo Public Schools Superintendent Michael Rice says that Michigan needs to spend "substantially" more on K-12 education and other services that support low-income children and other youngsters with special needs. "I'm calling for a substantially larger investment in children," Rice said in a presentation to his board Thursday on educational funding.
WMU Hockey
9:25 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Western Michigan looks to defend CCHA tournament championship

Credit GS Photo/WMU Media Relations

Western Michigan University will host the University of Michigan this weekend in a CCHA tournament series. The Broncos won the tournament last year. Mlive Kalamazoo Reporter David Drew joined WMUK's Gordon Evans to look at Western's chances in the CCHA tournament. 

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