The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Royal Recovery: Remains ID'd As Those Of King Richard III

An enlarged image of the skull identified as that of King Richard III. Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, is pointing to a detail.
Rui Vieira PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 6:10 pm

Remains found under what's now a parking lot in the English city of Leicester have been confirmed to be those of King Richard III, researchers at the University of Leicester announced Monday.

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Digital Life
2:19 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

When Private Actions Go Very Public

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 2:33 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee.

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Health
2:14 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

The Unexpected Side Effects Of Chemotherapy

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 3:13 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Chemotherapy can be a painful and disruptive experience that can affect almost every aspect of a cancer patient's life. We hear most often about things like nausea and hair loss, of course, but people aren't necessarily prepared to lose, say, the taste of their favorite food, or develop insomnia.

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Remembrances
2:01 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Remembering Rosa Parks On Her 100th Birthday

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 2:43 pm

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks would have been 100 years old today. NPR's Celeste Headlee talks with listeners about the first time they learned about Parks and what she signifies today.

Author Interviews
1:19 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

A Barbados Family Tree With 'Sugar In The Blood'

SPrada iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:44 pm

In her new book, Sugar in the Blood, Andrea Stuart weaves her family story around the history of slavery and sugar in Barbados. Stuart's great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather landed on the island in the 1630s. He had been a blacksmith in England, but became a sugar planter in Barbados, at a time when demand for the crop was exploding worldwide. Stuart is descended from a slave owner who, several generations after the family landed in Barbados, had relations with an unknown slave.

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National Security
12:56 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

The CIA And The Hazards Of Middle East Forecasting

Egyptian President Anwar Sadat is flanked by senior military officers as he reviews maps of battlefield developments in the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. He's shown at army headquarters in Cairo on Oct. 15, 1973. Egypt and Syria attacked Israel, catching Israel and the CIA off-guard.
AP

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 8:48 am

Government agencies do not often acknowledge their own errors, but the CIA has done just that with the declassification of intelligence memoranda on the 1973 Arab-Israeli War.

The documents show that agency analysts, down to the last minute before the outbreak of fighting, were assuring President Nixon, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and other policymakers that Egypt and Syria were unlikely to attack Israel.

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Milo Miles is Fresh Air's world-music and American-roots music critic. He is a former music editor of The Boston Phoenix.

Miles is a contributing writer for Rolling Stone magazine, and he also writes about music for The Village Voice and The New York Times.

Music
12:17 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

For Kidjo, Musicians Must Be The Country's Voice

Singer Angelique Kidjo of Benin performs during the opening concert for the soccer World Cup at Orlando stadium in Soweto, South Africa, June 10, 2010.
Hassan Ammar AP

Singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo was born in Benin, West Africa. Today, she lives in New York City and is widely considered Africa's greatest living diva.

For Kidjo, music provides an outlet for both activism and pleasure. "Those two things are part of my stability," she tells NPR's Michel Martin. "I need that. No human being has endless compassion, you need to replenish yourself, and I know that if I didn't have music, I'd go crazy."

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Music Reviews
12:02 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Yo La Tengo: Decades In And Far From Fading

Yo La Tengo's new album is titled Fade.
Carlie Armstron Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:19 pm

Yo La Tengo wouldn't seem to be very rock 'n' roll, given that it's a very stable and long-lasting operation. Since 1991, the lineup has consisted of a married couple — drummer Georgia Hubley and guitarist Ira Kaplan, along with bassist James McNew — and all three play additional instruments as needed. Yo La Tengo has been with the same label, Matador, since 1993. But if the band lacks rock dramatics, I would argue that it knows as much about the modes and manners of rock 'n' roll as anyone who has ever played the music.

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NPR Story
11:27 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Political Chat: Gun Control And The President

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:51 am

The debate over gun control continues to dominate the headlines. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate doubles the number of African-American members by welcoming William 'Mo" Cowan. He replaces John Kerry. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie and Keli Goff, political correspondent for The Root.

NPR Story
11:27 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Ads: Winners And Losers

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:51 am

Some people enjoy the Super Bowl commercials more than the football game. Host Michel Martin and Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans run through the best and worst ads; from senior citizens making late night trips to Taco Bell to nerds getting really sloppy kisses.

NPR Story
11:27 am
Mon February 4, 2013

African Americans Fly High With Math And Science

Barrington Irving , a 23-year-old Jamaican-born pilot, at a news conference at Opa-locka Airport Wednesday, June 27, 2007, ending a three-month journey he said would make him the youngest person to fly around the world alone.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:48 pm

This Black History Month, Tell Me More is taking a look at African Americans in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) who are inspiring future generations.

Today, Barrington Irving shares how his sky high dreams became a reality. A chance encounter in his parents' bookstore put him on a path that would make him the youngest person and first African American to fly solo around the world.

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10:50 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission to Pick Search Firm Monday

Lead in text: 
Almost 220 city employees accepted an early retirement incentive, to fix a $6 million budget shortage. Among the 219 employees, City Manager Kenneth Collard will retire late next year, as well as Assistant City Manager Jerri Barnett-Moore. The Kalamazoo City Commission will interview three search firms Monday afternoon, one of which will help find the next city manager.
The public interviews start at 4 p.m. in the Community Room at Kalamazoo City Hall, 241 W. South St. Representatives from Bob Murray & Associates of Roseville, Calif., Colin Baenziger & Associates of Wellington, Fla., and Strategic Government Resources of Keller, Texas will interview with the seven commissioners either in person or by a video conference.
Europe
10:45 am
Mon February 4, 2013

For Greeks, Painful Cuts Keep Tearing At The Social Fabric

Georgia Kolia, 63, has two adult children, both unemployed. She works as a volunteer distributing loaves of bread at the Agia Zonis Orthodox church soup kitchen for the poor in Athens, Greece, in April 2012.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Greeks are feeling the squeeze. The social repercussions of three years of austerity measures imposed by international lenders are hitting hard. Thousands of businesses have shut down, unemployment is nearly 27 percent and rising, and the once dependable safety net of welfare benefits is being pulled in.

With further cutbacks and tax hikes about to kick in, Greece's social fabric is being torn apart.

Nowhere are cutbacks more visible and painful than in health care.

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Bacterial Meningitis death
8:18 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Kalamazoo College responds to death of student from bacterial meningitis

Stetson Chapel
Credit WMUK - file photo

A 19 year old Kalamazoo College student has died from bacterial meningitis. Emily Stillman died early Sunday morning of complications from the disease. 

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7:23 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Snyder to weigh in on Medicaid controversy in budget proposal

Lead in text: 
Governor has said he is concerned about whether additional Medicaid patients can get treatment in health care system.
Lansing - Gov. Rick Snyder will fire the first shot in the next health care skirmish Thursday when he recommends in his budget presentation to the Legislature whether Michigan should open Medicaid to as many as half a million more residents.
Around the Nation
7:20 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Twitter Lit Up When Superdome Lost Power

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you can imagine, Twitter was on fire during the Super Bowl. But the Twitterverse really lit up when the lights went out at the Superdome. Predictably, someone created a Twitter account named SuperBowlLights, and there were tweets like this: Only need half the lights anyway, as only half the teams are playing - that's just mean. Many people tweeted that it must have been Beyonce who knocked out the lights with her electric half-time show

Business
7:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Canadian Government Retires Its Penny

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

The Canadian mint stops distributing pennies on Monday. Canada stopped making one-cent coins last year to cut costs, since each penny cost 1.6 cents to make. Most stores will round out change to the nearest five cents.

7:18 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Venture Capital investments rise in Michigan, bucking national trend

Lead in text: 
2012 totals represent best year for venture capital in Michigan since Money Tree report started in 1995
MICHIGAN - Venture capital investing in Michigan had one of its best years ever in 2012, setting the stage for what one venture investor sees as "another very big year" for further growth.
Read More: http://mibiz.com
7:00 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Snyder criticized over large "rainy day fund"

Lead in text: 
Liberals say money could help families suffering hardship, conservatives call for reducing taxes
Most people agree that it makes sense for a state -- or a household -- to have savings set aside in case an emergency arises. But as Gov. Rick Snyder prepares to deliver his third budget address on Thursday, the size of Michigan's Rainy Day Fund has become a subject of controversy.
WMU sports
6:43 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Women's Basketball: Toledo 65 Western Michigan 54

Western Michigan's women's basketball team lost at Toledo on Sunday, 65-54. The Broncos are 6-15 overall and 2-6 in the Mid-American Conference. Western plays at Kent State on Wednesday. 

6:27 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Enbridge still faces criticism despite pipeline approval

Lead in text: 
Landowners and environmental groups say old pipeline should not be left in place. Some want a federal review of the plan.
It has been almost six months since Debora Hense vented her frustration after crews working on behalf of Canadian pipeline company Enbridge knocked down trees on her property.
6:20 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Kalamazoo College student who died of meningitis remembered by fellow students

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo College officials say no other cases of bacterial meningitis have been identified on campus
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Stillman was funny, she was sarcastic, she was overwhelming. She was the one who would say what everyone else wouldn't. But most importantly, she was just Emily. "You just feel her when she walks into a room," Caddow said. "You just know Emily Stillman is there."
Middle East
5:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Syrian Opposition Leader Holds Talks With Russia, Iran

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Analysis
5:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Politics In the News

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama is taking his campaign against gun violence to the country, beginning today with a trip to Minneapolis and a visit to that city's police department. Many police organizations favor tougher gun laws. The president leaves behind a new Congress that's getting down to business. And consuming most of lawmakers' time: the budget and the deficit.

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Europe
5:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Violence At Both Ends Of Political Spectrum Threatens Greece

A protester holds a petrol bomb during clashes with riot police after a demonstration against new austerity measures outside the parliament in Athens, Greece, on Nov. 7.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 8:33 pm

Escalating political violence from both the left and right is raising fears of political instability in debt-burdened Greece. The conservative-led government is cracking down on leftist groups, vowing to restore law and order.

But the opposition says authorities are trying to divert people's attention from growing poverty and despair.

Take the latest explosion in Athens — a firebomb at a crowded suburban mall last month that slightly injured two security guards.

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Ben Bradford is a city kid, who came to Charlotte from San Francisco by way of New York, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. Prior to his career in journalism, Ben spent time as an actor, stuntman, viral marketer, and press secretary for a Member of Congress. He graduated from UCLA in 2005 with a degree in theater and from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in 2012. As a reporter, his work has been featured on NPR, WNYC, the BBC, and Public Radio International.

Robin Sussingham is a reporter/producer and host at WUSF Public Broadcasting.  A native of Lakeland, she frequently reports on events and issues in Polk County.

She came to WUSF from public radio stations KUER and KCPW in Utah, has contributed stories to NPR and Marketplace, and has an extensive background in newspapers, magazines and online reporting. 

Crisis In The Housing Market
3:36 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Foreclosure Process Hammers Florida's Housing Market

A sign hangs outside a house in Miami in 2010. Currently, Florida's foreclosure legal process can take a couple of years, which critics say is hurting the housing market.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

A decade ago, speculators in Florida were pumping up a huge housing bubble.

"You couldn't go wrong," Tampa real estate attorney Charlie Hounchell says. In that overheated period from 2001 to 2006, "you could buy a house and make $100,000 a year later by selling it," he says.

But the party ended in 2007 and the hangover persists. The state now has the highest foreclosure rate in the country, beating out Nevada for the first time in five years.

Experts say the legal process in Florida is the key reason for the sluggish pace of foreclosures there.

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World
3:34 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Tsunami Debris On Alaska's Shores Like 'Standing In Landfill'

Trash, much of it believed to be debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami, litters the beach on Montague Island, Alaska, on Jan. 26.
Annie Feidt for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 10:51 am

Refrigerators, foam buoys and even ketchup bottles are piling up on Alaska's beaches. Almost two years after the devastating Japanese tsunami, its debris and rubbish are fouling the coastlines of many states — especially in Alaska.

At the state's Montague Island beach, the nearly 80 miles of rugged wilderness looks pristine from a helicopter a few thousand feet up. But when you descend, globs of foam come into view.

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