World
8:07 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Prospector In Australia Finds Giant Gold Nugget

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. An amateur prospector in Australia thought he'd stumbled on a car hood. It turned out to be a giant gold nugget shaped like a goldfish. The owner of the local gold shop told the Herald newspaper that if the anonymous prospector was silly enough to melt it down it would be worth nearly $300,000.

Unlikely, since its size and shape make it so rare. The gold will be worth far more to a museum or collector. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Food
7:59 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Subway Foot-Long Sub Comes Up Short

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with news of a fast food chain that's coming up short. Earlier this week, a customer in Australia ordered a Subway Foot-Long sub only to find it measured a mere 11 inches. He posted a photo alongside a tape measure on the company's Facebook page, sparking outrage from customers and an investigation by the New York Post. They bought seven Subway Foot-Longs in New York City and four of them measured less than 12 inches. Subway is looking into this sizable matter.

7:45 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Snyder leaning toward seeking a second term

Governor says he hasn't finished some of the things he started
The day after his third State of the State address, Gov. Rick Snyder contemplated his political future. He's up for re-election in 2014 and is starting the process of deciding whether to take the plunge. In an interview with the Free Press Editorial Board Thursday, he said he's leaning toward running for a second term.
7:43 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Snyder's call for more early childhood education funds welcomed by advocates

Upjohn Institute Economist Tim Bartik says current per-child funding isn't enough to run a quality program
MORE OF THIS: Gov. Rick Snyder joined a growing chorus of political and business voices in favor of increased funding for Michigan's Great Start Readiness preschool program. (Bridge photo/Lance Wynn) By Chris Andrews/Bridge Magazine contributor Thousands of low-and moderate-income children took a step closer to the preschool classroom with Wednesday night's call for additional early childhood investment by Michigan Gov.
7:25 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Snyder says voters could decide how road funding is paid for

But governor says doing nothing will only make problem worse.
Mount Pleasant - Gov. Rick Snyder hit the road Thursday with his pitch for getting $1.2 billion more per year from drivers to repair Michigan's roads as key lawmakers began crafting a legislative plan that could include a vote on a statewide sales tax as early as May.
7:21 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Bill would exempt Michigan-made firearms from federal regulations

Similar legislation was introduced in the Michigan Senate in 2009, but never made it out of committee.
LANSING, MI - Republican Senators introduced a bill to prohibit federal regulation of Michigan-made firearms that stay within the state. The move came on the same day President Barack Obama asked Congress to reinstate bans on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines and to pass universal background checks for gun purchases.
7:14 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Wolf hunt could be delayed by petition drive

Michigan's Board of Canvassers has approved the group's petition, allowing them to begin collecting signatures.
A referendum challenge to Michigan's new law on gray wolves could delay the creation of a hunting season for the animals by a year and a half. Late last month, Gov. Rick Snyder signed into law Public Act 520 giving Michigan's Natural Resources Commission the power to decide if there should be a wolf hunting season.
Politics
6:55 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Does Obama's Second-Term Agenda Need Beefing Up?

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama is set to take the oath of office for a second time. He has promised an ambitious agenda for the next four years. NPR's Mara Liasson tackles the question of whether it's ambitious enough.

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NPR Story
6:33 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Kenyans Expect More From U.S. President With African Roots

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As President Obama prepares to start a second term, MORNING EDITION has asked NPR's foreign correspondents to gauge worldwide expectations for the next four years. We turn, this morning, to Kenya. Pride still runs deep there for the president, with roots in Kenya. But expectations of America's role have shifted from donor aid to partner in trade. NPR's Gregory Warner has the story.

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NPR Story
6:33 am
Fri January 18, 2013

CEO Marchionne Drives Chrysler's Dramatic Turnaround

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

With the global auto industry gathered in Detroit this week for the city's renowned auto show, Renee Montagne talks to Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne about his company's stunning turnaround, manufacturing overseas and a Chrysler IPO.

6:30 am
Fri January 18, 2013

WMU President John Dunn among critics of disparities in spending on sports

Dunn presented a study comparing spending on athletics at larger universities with smaller schools.
6:13 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission expects to set interviews for potential search firms

The commission is looking for a search firm to find its next City Manager
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Consultant Evaluation Panel, made up of Mayor Bobby Hopewell, Vice Mayor Hannah McKinney and City Commissioner Don Cooney on Thursday recommended the city commission allot 40 minutes for each firm, with a five-minute break between, starting at 4 p.m. on Feb. 4. The city commission has to approve the recommendation in order for it to become the schedule.
Media
5:30 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Media Circus: The Football Star And The Will To Believe

Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o speaks Nov. 29 after he received a sportsmanship award from the Awards and Recognition Association in South Bend, Ind.
Joe Raymond AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:05 am

One of the top collegiate football players in the country, Notre Dame's Manti Te'o, was lionized by the media amid stories of his perseverance on the field after both his grandmother and his girlfriend died.

Thanks to an expose by Deadspin, the girlfriend's very existence is now believed to be a hoax, throwing the Heisman runner-up and his university on the defensive.

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Arts & Life
3:41 am
Fri January 18, 2013

In A Fragmented Cultureverse, Can Pop References Still Pop?

At Tyler Perry's live performances, his gospel-tinged references aren't meant for everyone in the audience.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

On a recent episode of Saturday Night Live when the comedian Louis C.K. played host, one skit parodied his eponymous show on F/X. It riffed on the theme song and the discursive style of his comedy.

But here's the thing: Fewer than 2 million people watch Louie. About 7 million watch Saturday Night Live. That means even optimistically, at least two-thirds of the audience is missing the joke.

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The Two-Way
3:38 am
Fri January 18, 2013

As Social Issues Drive Young From Church, Leaders Try To Keep Them

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

On Friday, Morning Edition wraps up its weeklong look at the growing number of people who say they do not identify with a religion. The final conversation in the Losing Our Religion series picks up on a theme made clear throughout the week: Young adults are drifting away from organized religion in unprecedented numbers. In Friday's story, NPR's David Greene talks to two religious leaders about the trend and wonders what they tell young people who are disillusioned with the church.

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Animals
3:36 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Figuring How to Pay For (Chimp) Retirement

Hannah and Marty eat watermelon snacks at the Save the Chimps sanctuary.
Save the Chimps

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:06 pm

Retirees flock to Florida — and the Sunshine State even has a retirement home for chimpanzees.

There, chimps live in small groups on a dozen man-made islands. Each 3-acre grassy island has palm trees and climbing structures, and is surrounded by a moat.

This is Save the Chimps, the world's biggest sanctuary for chimps formerly used in research experiments or the entertainment industry, or as pets. The chimps living here — 266 of them — range in age from 6 years old to over 50. And as sanctuary Director Jen Feuerstein drives around in a golf cart, she recognizes each one.

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It's All Politics
3:32 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Latino Voters Urge Obama To Keep Immigration Promise

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:35 am

Latino voters were a key to President Obama's victory in November, turning out in big numbers and supporting Obama by more than 2 to 1 over Republican Mitt Romney.

Now, many of those voters say it's time for Obama to do something he did not do in his first term: push hard for and sign a comprehensive immigration overhaul.

Let's start with a group of Latinos — young and old, some U.S. citizens, some not — heading from Florida to Washington, D.C., for Obama's inauguration and for meetings with members of Congress. As caravans go, it's a small one: 13 people in two vans.

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StoryCorps
3:31 am
Fri January 18, 2013

The Moment Race Mattered: A Haunting Childhood Memory

Bernard Holyfield (right) shares a childhood story with his friend Charles Barlow, about growing up in a racially charged Alabama during the early 1960s.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:11 am

When Bernard Holyfield was 5 years old, he was the proud owner of a dog named Lassie, a collie who closely resembled the namesake fictional dog on television.

"And we used to always keep Lassie tied up at the house with a chain, kind of like our protector," Holyfield explains to his friend Charles Barlow, 63, for StoryCorps at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta.

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Local Music
11:57 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Inflatable Best Friend: Fuzzed-out, punk garage rock

From left to right: Bassist Austin McQuater, guitarist Tanner Boerman, and drummer Ian Howell
Credit Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The Kalamazoo band Inflatable Best Friend has just come out with their first album called DMT Bike Ride. Guitarist Tanner Boerman, drummer Ian Howell, and bassist Austin McQuater say the band has come a long way from when they started it in high school. 

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Theatre
11:36 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Musical follows the downfall of Jackie Kennedy's relatives

Credit The Kalamazoo Civic Theatre

Jackie Kennedy Onassis is one of the most iconic first ladies in history. She was born into a wealthy family and continued to live a life a luxury even after John F. Kennedy’s death. But the lives of her aunt and first cousin turned out very differently.

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7:02 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Kalamazoo City officials, Adams Outdoor advertising differ on proposed billboard moratorium

City Commission is scheduled to vote on a six month moratorium on LED billboards at its January 22nd meeting.
Kalamazoo City Planner Andrea Augustine and Jeff Chamberlain, head of the city's community development and planning department, answered questions in a live chat Thursday at the MLive Kalamazoo Gazette news hub. Jeannine Dodson, general manager at Adams Outdoor Advertising, joined in, adding her views to the conversation.
Shots - Health News
6:26 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

It's Legal For Some Insurers To Discriminate Based On Genes

Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine.
David Paul Morris Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 10:48 am

Getting the results of a genetic test can be a bit like opening Pandora's box. You might learn something useful or interesting, or you might learn that you're likely to develop an incurable disease later on in life.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
5:53 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Homebuilding Is Booming, But Skilled Workers Are Scarce

New homebuilding reached a 4 1/2 year high in December, welcome news for an industry that lost 2 million jobs during the downturn. Despite those job losses, the sector is experiencing a labor shortage in some parts of the U.S.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:29 pm

The construction industry in the U.S. is staging a comeback. In one indicator, the Commerce Department announced Thursday that new homebuilding has reached its highest level in 4 1/2 years.

While that's a promising sign for the industry, more than 2 million construction jobs have been lost in the sector since employment hit its peak. While some might expect that means plenty of people are ready to fill the new jobs, many markets around the country are actually experiencing a shortage of construction workers.

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Environment
5:43 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Understanding Climate Change, With Help From Thoreau

Researchers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin are comparing modern flower blooming data with notes made by Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold. The sight of irises blooming during a Boston winter helped spur the research.
Darlyne A. Murawski Getty Images/National Geographic Creative

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 12:35 pm

Modern scientists trying to understand climate change are engaged in an unlikely collaboration — with two beloved but long-dead nature writers: Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold.

The authors of Walden and A Sand County Almanac and last spring's bizarrely warm weather have helped today's scientists understand that the first flowers of spring can continue to bloom earlier, as temperatures rise to unprecedented levels.

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All Tech Considered
5:38 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Bump On The Road For Driverless Cars Isn't Technology, It's You

Car companies are picking up automobile concepts such as this Lexus SL 600 Integrated Safety driverless research vehicle, shown at the Consumer Electronics Show in early January in Las Vegas.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 1:07 am

When you watch science fiction movies, you notice there are two things that seem like we will get in the future — a silver jumpsuit and driverless cars.

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Remembrances
4:57 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Woman Behind 'Dear Abby' Guided Readers Through Personal Crises

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Her real name was Pauline Friedman Phillips, and she was one of the most widely read advice columnists in the world. You probably recognize her as Dear Abby.

Phillips died yesterday at a hospital in Minneapolis. She was 94 and had struggled for many years with Alzheimer's.

NPR's Neda Ulaby has this remembrance.

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Around the Nation
4:57 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Many Of Nation's Mayors Receptive To Obama's Ideas On Reducing Gun Violence

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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U.S.
4:57 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Aurora Theater's Reopening Sparks Mixed Emotions

Workers dismantle the fence around the remodeled Century theater in Aurora, Colo., in preparation for the cinema's reopening Thursday. The theater's owner sent 2,000 invitations to the private event, being held for victims' families and first responders.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:10 pm

The Aurora, Colo., theater where 12 people were killed in a mass shooting last summer reopens Thursday, with a private event for victims' families and first responders.

But some families are giving the event a pass, arguing that the decision to reopen is insensitive. Jessica Watts lives just a few miles from the theater where her cousin, Jonathan Blunk, and 11 others were killed and dozens more wounded.

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Shots - Health News
3:52 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Anonymity In Genetic Research Can Be Fleeting

Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G. Your code is unique and could be used to find you.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:12 pm

People who volunteer for medical research usually expect to remain anonymous. That includes people who donate their DNA for use in genetic studies.

But now researchers have shown that in some cases, they can trace research subjects' DNA back to them with ease. And they say the risk of being identified from genetic information will only increase.

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3:07 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

New Otsego scholarship "inspired" by the Kalamazoo Promise

The fund will generate $65,000 a year to help Otsego High School graduates attend college through 2016. After that the amount available will depend on how well the fund's investments do.
OTSEGO, MI -- The Kalamazoo Promise was the inspiration for siblings Ruth and Emil Popke Jr. to create a new scholarship program for Otsego High School graduates, says Bill Vandersalm, the Popkes' attorney. The Popke Family High School Scholarship Fund, which has an initial endowment of $2 million from the estate of Emil "Bud" Popke Jr., was unveiled Tuesday by Otsego school officials.

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