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11:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Black, Gay And Scared Of Sex

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:39 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
11:33 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Jay Z Has Another Problem To Add To His 99

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:25 am

Social media is still buzzing about the video of Beyonce's younger sister Solange attacking Jay Z while leaving a party. But is it any of our business? The Beauty Shop ladies weigh in.

Around the Nation
7:10 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Hotel Guests Find Many Things To Complain About

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:27 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. If you're requesting a dead mouse for your hotel room, it probably means you brought your pet boa along on your vacation. That's just one of the strange requests - and complaints - reported by hotel staff to the travel website Skyscanner. Among the weirder complaints: The waiter was too handsome and the ice cream too cold and no steak on the vegetarian menu. Plus, one guest groaned that his girlfriend's snoring kept him awake. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:05 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Indiana Temporarily Suspends Vanity License Plates

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep, with an update on a battle over free speech.

Indiana told a police corporal last year his vanity license plates were no longer acceptable. The officer's plate said: OINK, O-I-N-K. He considered that an ironic statement on people calling him a pig. The state called it offensive speech. The cop sued, and has won. You can say oink in America. Say it now. The state stopped issuing vanity license plates, while it appeals.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:03 am
Wed May 14, 2014

More School Districts Rethink Zero-Tolerance Policies

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Earlier this year, the Obama administration asked schools across the country to rethink how they discipline students. Now, instead of automatic suspensions and other tough punishments, more schools are considering alternatives.

Laura Isensee, of Houston Public Media, takes a look at one of those alternatives.

LAURA ISENSEE, BYLINE: Two teenage girls come into the assistant principal's office at the Academy of Choice in northwest Houston. They used to be friends. But now they're fighting. It's time for a serious sit-down.

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