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Parenting
11:48 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Should Parents Nix After-School Sports?

High school athletes devote a lot of hours to practice and games. Parents and coaches say playing sports builds character and teamwork. But do sports take too much time away from the classroom? In a recent article for The Atlantic, writer Amanda Ripley makes the case against after-school sports. She joins host Michel Martin, along with parents Dani Tucker and Glenn Ivey.

Politics
8:18 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Sen. Durbin Wants Budget Showdown To End Quickly

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 9:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All right. Let's talk more about that debate in Congress, which must pass a bill by Sept. 30 to keep the government running or see a partial shutdown. Republicans in the House passed a bill to fund the government but defund Obamacare; and now that bill is in the Senate, where Richard Durbin of Illinois is the Senate majority whip, the No. 2 Democrat in charge of counting votes. Senator, welcome back to the program.

SEN. RICHARD DURBIN: Good to be with you, Steve.

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Around the Nation
7:13 am
Tue September 24, 2013

New York State Tries To Safely Accommodate Texting Drivers

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 9:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Europe
7:00 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Double Yolks Found In 6 Consecutive Eggs

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 9:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

In England, a man went to the store and bought a package of six eggs. He cracked the first one open and found a double yolk. Then he cracked open the second, two yolks in that one as well. It turns out all six eggs were like that. The chances of that happening: about one in a trillion. As unlikely as winning the lottery, the man said, before adding the lottery would be better, obviously. Still, what a way to beat the odds with eggs?

National Security
4:47 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Militant Group Al-Shabab Evolves With Help From Al-Qaida

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 9:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the strike on Nairobi was noteworthy in part because of the group claiming responsibility. As David and Gregory mentioned, al-Shabab is a militant organization from nearby Somalia. Analyst Bronwyn Bruton of the Atlantic Council says a few years ago it would've had little reason to strike outside Somalia's borders. More recently, al-Shabab has been evolving, turned to new purposes by the influence of al-Qaida.

BRONWYN BRUTON: It emerged in 2005 in the wake of international efforts to create a government in Somalia.

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