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2:03 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Barbez Mines Resistance And Tradition Of Italian Jews

New York musician Dan Kaufman (third from right) traveled to Rome to learn more about the city's Jewish community and the Italian resistance during WWII. The result is a new album by his band Barbez, based in part on the lost melodies of Roman Jewish music.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 11:28 am

The unique musical traditions of Rome's ancient Jewish community were almost lost for good. Now, those melodies are being revived — not by musicologists, but by a rock band based in New York.

"I fell in love with the melodies, and I started to re-imagine them for my band in our own style," says Dan Kaufman, guitarist and leader of the Brooklyn band Barbez.

The Tradition

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:28 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 12:32 pm

Now that he's done his New York Times op-ed, our panelists predict what Vladimir Putin will write a column about next.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:28 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 12:32 pm

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, on to our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players now has 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can, each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL ANNOUNCER: Mo Rocca and Faith Salie are tied for first. Each has three points. P.J. O'Rourke has two.

SAGAL: OK. P.J., you are pulling up the rear, so you're going to go first. The clock will start when I begin your first question. Fill in the blank.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:28 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 12:32 pm

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Chicken Latte, Bieber Barbasol, Blabbermouth.

Shots - Health News
6:04 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

After Disasters, DNA Science Is Helpful, But Often Too Pricey

A Thai medic checks bodies for forensic identity in Phang Nga province in southern of Thailand on Jan. 11, 2005. Thousands of people were killed in Thailand after a massive tsunami struck on Dec. 26, 2004.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 7:32 pm

Human DNA is the ultimate fingerprint. A single hair can contain enough information to determine someone's identity — a feature that's been invaluable for identifying the unnamed casualties of natural disasters and war. But forensic scientists who use DNA say the technology isn't always available where it's most needed, like in poor countries, or in war zones like Syria.

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