Chris Killian

Correspondent

Chris Killian is a freelance journalist with nearly a decade of experience at WMUK, the Kalamazoo Gazette, the Grand Rapids Press, the Christian Science Monitor and other online and print publications.

His Swing State Stories project took him through many of the battleground states before the 2012 election. on his off hours, Killian  he plays his Martin DX-1 acoustic guitar and continues his quest to make the perfect lemon meringue pie.

Swing State Stories: http://www.swingstatestories.com

Kalamazoo singer-songwriter and piano player Casey Grooten
Chris Killian

The Kalamazoo Valley Museum will hold a concert Friday night highlighting local transgender and gender non-specific artists called “Unified: A Kalamazoo Music Experience.” The show starts at 7 p.m. at the museum's Stryker Theater. Admission is $5.

For years, Davison Nicholas sang and played in the rock band Two Stars Burning Sun, among many other bands. The muscley and sometimes melodic music was driving and intense. 

2013's Great Grown Up Spelling Bee
Kalamazoo Public Library

Spelling bees used to be about nervous kids in their Sunday best, dusting off words no longer a part of common speech. But Wednesday night you can experience a very different kind of bee. This one isn’t for kids and it’s all about the fun.

Living Images Photography / iStock Photo

Like many cities, Kalamazoo has a trust problem. Many minority residents aren’t happy with the way they’re treated by the city’s Public Safety officers. And many in the department feel the public doesn’t give them enough credit. Could changing a largely white, male police force into one that’s more diverse help bridge that gap? In the last part of our series on the issue, WMUK’s Chris Killian reports on differing approaches to building better police-community relationships.

Danny Bailey / iStock Photo

The City of Kalamazoo had a violent summer this year. There was a significant increase in gun-related violence and several deaths, including the murder of a young boy in the Edison neighborhood. That incident, and others, aggravated a sense of mistrust in Kalamazoo’s Public Safety Department among the city’s minority residents. WMUK’s Chris Killian reports in the second of three reports about the “trust gap”.

Alex Schmidt / iStock Photo

Police officers fight crime but to do that they face a bigger challenge: getting their communities to trust them. Today we begin a three-part series on what some call a “trust gap” between Kalamazoo’s Public Safety Department and minority residents. ​For the first report in this series, WMUK’s Chris Killian rode with a Public Safety officer to see how the issue looks to his eyes. This report contains some adult language.

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