Earlene McMichael

Morning Edition Host

  Earlene McMichael became WMUK's local host of NPR's Morning Edition in August 2012. A former, long-time Kalamazoo Gazette editor, reporter, and columnist, she was a news anchor at WHCU-FM when it was owned by Cornell University, her alma mater.

Earlene McMichael | WMUK

On today's WestSouthwest, we bring you an extended version of WMUK's Earlene McMichael's January interview with Cheree Thomas. She’s the new director of the Douglass Community Association, a 97-year-old outreach center in Kalamazoo that keeps keeping on thanks to public support. Thomas has been on the job now for five months.


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, spoke in Kalamazoo on March 29, and WMUK was there recording live. After her keynote address at Chenery Auditorium, our own Local Morning Edition Host Earlene McMichael interviewed her onstage for 40 minutes. A condensed version of that conversation airs at 9:30 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 13 on WestSouthwest, our award-winning public affairs show. 


Kalamazoo Valley Community College courtesy photo

On Friday and Saturday, April 7-8, Kalamazoo Valley Community College hosts the Kalamazoo Foodways Symposium, and the keynote speaker is Toni Tipton-Martin, an award-winning food and nutrition journalist and activist who runs a foundation dedicated to food-justice issues and healthy living. She speaks at 6 p.m. Friday at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum. It is free, open to the public and does not require registration. (Click on the icon to hear an interview with her now, with a longer version below it.)


Manuel Balce Ceneta | Associated Press

Sybrina Fulton says she was catapulted from her quiet life as a civil service worker into high-profile anti-violence activism when her son Trayvon Martin was slain five years ago by a neighborhood watch volunteer. While it helped lead to the Black Lives Matter movement that draws attention to senseless deaths of African-Americans, Fulton says more is needed, like changes in laws. So she says she's contemplating running for office and will decide within the next few months. She speaks March 29 in Kalamazoo.


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

When it was time for Kalamazoo College senior Kaylah "Kami" Simmons to choose a capstone project to do this year, she thought of a famous man she met in high school -- Hal Jackson. He's an African-American who broke the color barrier in radio in the '30s and is in several Halls of Fame. She didn't know his significance back then. Now a theater arts major with a media studies concentration who's contemplating a journalism career, Simmons wants more people to know about Jackson and this Saturday presents a reader's theater play inspired by his life. He died in 2012 at 96.


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