Earlene McMichael

Morning Edition Host

  Earlene McMichael became WMUK's local host of NPR's Morning Edition in August 2012. A former, long-time Kalamazoo Gazette editor, reporter, and columnist, she was a news anchor at WHCU-FM when it was owned by Cornell University, her alma mater.

Courtesy photo

Her name is April Reign. With a single #OscarsSoWhite tweet two years ago this month, she spurred a national conversation about the lack of diversity in Oscar nominations. It's led to greater inclusiveness among the voters in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. But "there's so much more that needs to be done," she tells WMUK's Earlene McMichael on today's WestSouthwest show (listen now, below). Reign speaks Monday in Grand Rapids. 


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

What’s it like to ride downtown Kalamazoo’s San Francisco-style Holly Jolly Trolley

It has long been on Kalamazoo grandfather Kelly Casey's bucket list. “I wanted to do this for years, but I was working or having to get up early. So I didn’t have the opportunity."


Courtesy photo | Southern Poverty Law Center

If it seems like hate is increasing, it is. So says the Southern Poverty Law Center that has been monitoring domestic hate for nearly half a century.

Within 10 days of November's presidential election, about 850 incidences of hate and racial intimidation were reported to the center, says outreach director Lecia Brooks.

It rose to over 1,800 by March of this year. Brooks headlines the Kalamazoo Summit on Racism on Nov. 17 in Kalamazoo.


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

"Son, don't you ever forget the bridge that carried you across." Moses L. Walker recalls his mother often telling him that.

So Walker, a retired Borgess Medical Center executive who served multiple terms on the Kalamazoo City Commission and on many boards, says he always found ways to give back.

Now the Family Health Center in Kalamazoo has named the newest building at its headquarters after Walker. (Click icon to hear interview.)


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

That childhood trauma can compromise mental health is not new, but it altering the brain is, says Jennifer Nottingham, associate director of community impact at the United Way of the Battle Creek and Kalamazoo Region.

She says it can cause learning and behavioral issues for students and an increased risk for disease through adulthood.

But the good news is, there's ways to mitigate trauma's effects, which is why she says the United Way is hosting free screenings of a documentary on the topic.


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