Gordon Evans

News Reporter/Producer

WMUK's Morning Edition anchor, Gordon Evans is also an accomplished reporter and interviewer. A 1990 graduate of Michigan State, he came to WMUK from WAAM in Ann Arbor.

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1:12 pm
Mon February 25, 2013

New state Democratic leader wants to broaden base

Lead in text: 
Lon Johnson takes over leadership of the Michigan Democratic Party with eyes on 2014 election.
Detroit - Lon Johnson vowed to broaden the Michigan Democratic Party's traditional fundraising and volunteer base beyond the union halls of organized labor en route to becoming state party chairman this weekend.
1:06 pm
Mon February 25, 2013

Michigan business leaders support raising gas taxes, vehicle fees to repair roads

Lead in text: 
Representatives of industries such as tourism and agriculture say the state's needs to pay for better roads.
LANSING, MI - Several Michigan business leaders called on lawmakers and the governor to increase gas taxes and vehicle registration fees to raise money for the state's crumbling roads and bridges. They said deteriorating roads hurt everything from manufacturing and agriculture to tourism and a host of other businesses.
Kellogg breakfast
7:56 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Kellogg expands world hunger relief efforts

Kellogg and its foundation "Kellogg Corporate Citizenship Fund" plan to increase access to breakfast around the world. 

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7:50 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Michigan agencies use taxpayer money for lobbying

Lead in text: 
Staff time spent trying to influence lawmakers. Governor's spokesman says it's not "insidious."
Lobbying is normal in the course of public business, but when the government lobbies itself, the practice can involve taxpayer resources used to pursue a political agenda. Like expanding a state-run district that manages underachieving schools. Restructuring a major health care insurer. Or enacting right to work.
6:37 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Low lake levels lead to scramble for money to dredge harbors

Lead in text: 
Water levels at or near historic lows threatens shipping industry and tourism.
So much of Pentwater's well-being hinges on the channel - the 2,500-foot-long entryway from Lake Michigan to the harbor. The channel brings in boats. The boats bring in visitors. The visitors bring in money. And the money sustains the village's shops, restaurants and vacation rental business.

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