Rebecca Thiele

Environment/Technology Reporter, host of "Arts & More"

Rebecca Thiele became the Arts & More producer for WMUK in 2011. Rebecca also reports on issues related to the environment and technology in Southwest Michigan. She assists the station with social media practices and occasionally anchors during All Things Considered. She is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

​Twitter: @beckythiele

E-mail: rebecca [dot] thiele [at] wmich [dot] edu

If I say the phrase “folk tales” you might think of "The Three Little Pigs" or "Hansel and Gretel." Those are great stories from Western cultures - countries like England and Germany - but there are so many more folk tales that you haven’t heard. 


Blue Veins playing at Shakespeare's Pub during their weekly blues jam
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The blues has always been a staple in Kalamazoo. But when the 411 Club closed three years ago, its blues jam - that predated the club - ended too.

“Once it closed down there wasn’t really a regular hangout for that genre of music," says Marissa Aguirre of the band Blue Veins - also known as Little Mo.


courtesy of Yolonda Lavender

In the past four years, Kalamazoo musician Yolonda Lavender has been busy. She became the executive director of the Black Arts & Cultural Center. That’s in addition to being a poet, an activist, and involved in countless organizations in Kalamazoo. But Lavender is finally getting back into the recording studio.


Cleon Ludwick installs the new energy-efficient lights in Western Michigan University's Friedmann Hall. If you look closely, you can see how blue the new lights look compared to the more yellow lights down the hall
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

We’ve been lucky this season, but Michigan winters are usually known for a lack of sunshine. For some people that can trigger seasonal depression. Western Michigan University has been moving to more energy-efficient light bulbs - with hope that the lights might have the added bonus of boosting the moods of students and staff. 


In this April 13, 2006, file photo, Pete Vavricka conducts an underground train from the entrance of Yucca Mountain in Nevada.
Isaac Breekken, AP Images

If Palisades Nuclear Power Plant shuts down next year, where will the nuclear waste go? The short answer is probably nowhere. 


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