Rebecca Thiele

Environment/Technology Reporter, host of "Arts & More"

Rebecca Thiele became the Arts & More producer for WMUK in 2011. Rebecca also reports on issues related to the environment and technology in Southwest Michigan. She assists the station with social media practices and occasionally anchors during All Things Considered. She is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

​Twitter: @beckythiele

E-mail: rebecca [dot] thiele [at] wmich [dot] edu

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Updated Thursday 6:25 a.m. There's now a centralized place for flood victims to find out the latest information on what resources are available, or to report damage and recovery needs--just call 2-1-1, reports the City of Kalamazoo's Facebook page. Meanwhile, only two Kalamazoo roads remain closed due to flooding, according to the city's website. They are E. Crosstown Parkway between Mills St. and S. Pitcher St., and Sheldon St. between S. Pitcher St. and E. Vine St.

Updated Wednesday 7:25 a.m. All but one flooded road has reopened in the downtown Kalamazoo area, according to a map posted on the city's website this morning. Still closed is E. Dutton St. between Jasper and Portage streets. Also, flood victims can pick up free cleanup kits and a few tools from noon to 6 p.m. today (Wednesday) at the Lakewood Fire Station, 3100 E. Lake St. in Kalamazoo, says a Kalamazoo County Sheriff's Office press release. The project is a partnership between the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army. For information, email jevand@kalcounty.com.

The City of Kalamazoo created this map of road closures and high-risk areas. For a detour map and other flooding information, visit the city's alert page.

Updated 6:25 a.m. Thursday, March 1. Two roads remain still closed in Kalamazoo due to flooding, according to the map. They are E. Crosstown Parkway between Mills St. and S. Pitcher St., and Sheldon St. between S. Pitcher St. and E. Vine St.

Jennifer Davis on Mount Democrat in Colorado, a 14,000-foot climb
courtesy of Jennifer Davis

A Kalamazoo woman with an incurable blood cancer is hiking to the base of Mount Everest. Even before you get to the mountain, altitudes on the trek can reach more than 18,000 feet. That’s about as high as the summit of Denali, the tallest mountain in North America. 


Art made for the theatre performance
Face Off Theatre

If you distilled the experiences of African Americans into an hour and 45 minutes, it might look something like “Ships, Shells, and Chains.” The play by Kalamazoo’s Kendra Ann Flournoy is a series of vignettes that follows a fictional family tree from a village in Africa all the way up to the present day in the United States.


Wind turbines stand tall above a farm field
courtesy of Consumers Energy

Consumers Energy says it will stop using coal by 2040 and get 40 percent of its energy from renewable sources. The company’s remaining five coal plants employ about 500 people. It shuttered seven of its facilities two years ago.

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