Rebecca Thiele

Environment/Technology Reporter, host of "Arts & More"

Rebecca Thiele became the Arts & More producer for WMUK in 2011. Rebecca also reports on issues related to the environment and technology in Southwest Michigan. She assists the station with social media practices and occasionally anchors during All Things Considered. She is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

​Twitter: @beckythiele

E-mail: rebecca [dot] thiele [at] wmich [dot] edu

Courtesy of the North by Midwest Micro-Budget Film Festival

If you’re a local film buff, this is the weekend for you. The North by Midwest Micro-Budget Film Festival (NxMW) and the Teen Filmmaker Festival have combined forces this year for one big film extravaganza in Kalamazoo. 


Cheyna Roth, Michigan Public Radio Network

President Trump will address a joint session of Congress for the first time on Tuesday evening at the Capitol, around 9:00 p.m. The address comes a day after Trump gave an outline of his budget plan for Congress, which would increase defense spending and make cuts to domestic programs. 

Carrie Vanderbush, the new executive director of Glass Art Kalamazoo
courtesy of Glass Art Kalamazoo

Glass Art Kalamazoo - formerly the West Michigan Glass Art Center - has a new executive director. Carrie Vanderbush will fill the position which has been vacant for the past two years. 

A truck hauls dirt to a corner of Top Grade Site Management's Salem Pit in Dorr. Top Grade says this pit is similar to the one proposed in Richland Township.
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The company that wants to mine gravel in Richland Township has withdrawn its permit. Not because many residents oppose the mine, but that the company says it doesn’t need a permit. 

A photo from the 1999 demolition of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. It was part of the decommissioning of the former nuclear power plant.
Jackie Johnston/AP Images

If you get your power from Consumers Energy, you’ve likely been putting money into a savings account for Palisades Nuclear Power Plant for years. Consumers charges rate-payers a small fee that goes into what’s called a decommissioning trust fund. That money will be used to clean up radioactive contamination at the site once Palisades shuts down. Right now there’s more than $400 million in the trust fund, but environmentalists worry it won’t be enough. 


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