Sehvilla Mann

Local Government/Education Reporter

Sehvilla Mann joined WMUK’s news team in January 2014 as a reporter on the local government and education beats. Before that she covered a variety of topics, including environmental issues, for Bloomington, Indiana NPR and PBS affiliates WFIU and WTIU. She’s also written and produced stories for the Pacifica Network and WYSO Public Radio in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Sehvilla holds a B.A. in French from Earlham College and an M.A. in journalism from Indiana University.

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Kalamazoo City Commissioners have more work ahead of them as they near a final vote on a permanent endowment for the city. The groundbreaking plan would use private donations to fix the city’s finances.

Kalamazoo Public Schools and three other districts appear to be moving closer to settling a lawsuit against the state. The districts went to court after the School Reform Office said it might close 38 schools, including two in Kalamazoo. 

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Commissioners are also considering major changes for the veteran services department.

Kalamazoo County appears likely to place a senior millage on the November ballot, though it still has to work out the details. On Tuesday commissioners set a special meeting for August 8 where they hope to hammer out the language.

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

The city also plans to switch to single-stream recycling.

Streets and parks in the City of Kalamazoo will get an update thanks in part to a large private donation the city received last year. On Monday, city commissioners agreed to spend $1,470,000 from the Foundation for Excellence for the work.

Among other things, the city plans updates for three parks, Davis, Rockwell and Frays. It’ll also add a sidewalk along part of Woodward Avenue and catch up with tree trimming and removal on the North Side.

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

This "Why's That?" story originally aired in August 2016. 

Years ago when Julie Allen’s son was in a stroller, she’d take him for walks on South Westnedge Avenue. That’s when a building set well back from the road caught her attention.

“I probably walked by it four or five times before I actually noticed the house,” she says.

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