WSW: Young Donors Predicted to Give Big Dollars, Big Ideas

Feb 8, 2018

Cover of the Johnson Center for Philanthropy's just-released report, "11 Trends in Philanthropy for 2018." The center is housed at Grand Valley State University.
Credit Courtesy photo

The face of philanthropy is getting younger. For the next few decades, Generation Xers and Millennials will be big donors--likely the largest in history. That's the prediction of the Johnson Center for Philanthropy at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids in its new report about 11 giving trends.


Michael Moody, philanthropy researcher
Credit Courtesy photo

While overall the younger generation doesn't have as many assets as their parents, some are growing in influence largely due to the "transfer of wealth" underway in America's richest families, says Michael Moody, the Frey Foundation Chair for Family Philanthropy at GVSU's Center for Philanthropy. That said, he adds that there are Gen Xers and Millennials accumulating unprecedented financial resources on their own.

Moody expounds on the giving trends in an interview airing today on WMUK's WestSouthwest news and public affairs show (listen now: click icon above). Moody, co-author of the "Generation Impact: How Next Gen Donors Are Revolutionizing Giving" book released last year, helped conduct some of the research in the Johnson Center for Philanthropy's report.

He says his research shows younger philanthropists are distinctive in that they want to be more hands-on with the nonprofits they support, giving of both "their talents and their treasures." They also desire innovative strategies, such as donating through collaborations like giving circles.

Other trends?

  • Global Giving
  • Equity & Inclusion
  • Government-Nonprofit Partnerships
  • Emphasis on Data
  • Place-based Philanthropy

To hear about all the trends, listen to the interview (both short and longer versions posted above). Click here for the full report.

WestSouthwest airs 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays on WMUK 102.1 FM, the National Public Radio station at Western Michigan University.