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NPR Story
4:50 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Two Years Later, Irene Haunts Vermonters

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, just as fires are a fact of life in the West, hurricanes smash into the Southeast every summer. But New England is something of a stranger to summer disasters, which is why it was huge news two years ago today when Irene hit Vermont. That tropical storm displaced 1,400 families.

Vermont Public Radio's Steve Zind has the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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All Songs Considered
3:39 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Okkervil River: Coming Of Age In Small Town America

Click to see an interactive map of Meriden, N.H., with stories from Okkervil River's Will Sheff about his childhood there.
William Schaff

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:15 pm

I grew up in a town of about 6,000 people in rural Kansas back in the '70s and '80s. I've never romanticized it much, though it was certainly a simpler time and, for better or worse, it's where I learned to make some sense of my life. The world you inhabit when you come of age in your teen years has a way of digging its claws in you. As the years pass, no matter how far you try to get away from it, it stays with you. The people, the places, the sounds and even the smells become a part of your DNA.

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Sweetness And Light
3:36 am
Wed August 28, 2013

How About A Gold Medal For Human Rights For Gay People?

A gay-rights activist chants slogans during a demonstration in front of the Russian Consulate in New York on July 31. Gays in the United States and elsewhere are outraged by Russia's intensifying campaign against gay-rights activism.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:46 pm

Let's see, now. That self-proclaimed fortress of liberty and fellowship, the International Olympic Committee, awards the Winter Olympics to Russia for 2014. After all, China worked out so well as an exemplar of freedom of the press at Beijing in 2008.

Then, Russia, duly a signator of the Olympic charter proclaiming the "preservation of human dignity," trots out an anti-homosexual law that would've made Ivan the Terrible have second thoughts.

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The March On Washington At 50
3:35 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Obama To Outline Unfinished Work, Decades After King's Dream

A spectator on the National Mall holds an image of President Obama and Martin Luther King during the 2013 presidential inauguration in January.
Gabriel B. Tait MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

President Obama will stand in the symbolic shadows of Martin Luther King and Abraham Lincoln Wednesday, as he marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

Aides say Obama will use the opportunity to celebrate the progress that's been made, thanks to the civil rights movement. He'll also discuss the work that he says still has to be done to realize King's dream of racial justice in America.

That includes fighting to protect voting rights and building what the president calls "ladders of opportunity" for poor people of all races.

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Around the Nation
3:00 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Woman Recovers After Getting Shot Shielding Neighbor's Kids

Carmesha Rogers snuggles with her 4-year-old daughter, Kasharee, on Aug. 22, in Muskegon, Mich. Rogers sustained a gunshot wound to the head on July 9 after removing several neighborhood children from a gunbattle's line of fire. Rogers says her only thought was: "Just get the kids out the way. 'Cause I'd want someone to do that for my kids."
Natalie Kolb Mlive.com/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Last month, a disagreement on a residential street in Muskegon, Mich., turned into a deadly gun battle. Six men were armed, one man was killed, and dozens of shots sprayed in all directions.

At the house directly behind the gunfight, three children were playing on the porch.

This scenario is not as rare in America as we'd like to think. But what happened next is: As the bullets zipped past the children, one woman ran into the line of fire to try to save them.

'Basically A War Zone'

It wasn't quite yet dinnertime.

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