Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6am - 10am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Parallels
3:19 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Israel's Internal Battle Over Ultra-Orthodox Soldiers

Soldiers close the gate to the tiny West Bank outpost, right next door to a Jewish settlement, where the HaHod platoon of the ultra-Orthodox Netzah Yahuda battalion is stationed.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 8:14 am

Moshe Haim always wanted to be a soldier. The 20-year-old is now a sergeant, more than halfway through three years of service in the Israeli military.

But when he goes home on leave, he doesn't talk about his military experiences to any of his eight siblings, especially his brothers.

"I know that for my parents and my brothers, the first, best choice is to be in the yeshiva and study there," he says at a small West Bank outpost where he's stationed. "It wasn't good for me, but my brothers are still pure."

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Middle East
3:17 am
Fri July 12, 2013

In Southern Syria, Rebels Say U.S. Support Is Critical

Free Syrian Army fighters after a battle against government troops in Zaizoon, near Dera'a, on Feb. 16.
Shaam News Network Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:38 pm

The battle for the city of Dera'a in southern Syria has become a test of an American pledge to give military support to rebels fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad. After a string of defeats, the rebels have scored rare victories around Dera'a.

But in interviews,rebel commanders passing through neighboring Jordan say those gains could be lost without a dependable arms pipeline and promised U.S. support.

Yasser Aboud, a thin, intense former colonel in the Syrian army, commands the joint operations center for southern Syria.

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StoryCorps
10:03 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

A Father And Daughter 'Keep The Faith' During Cancer Fight

Faith in 2008, on her fifth birthday.
Courtesy of Jerris Marr

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:13 am

For the past three years, StoryCorps' Legacy program has given people facing serious illness the chance to record interviews with loved ones and caregivers. Recently, StoryCorps expanded the program to include children.

In 2007, Faith Marr was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer on her spine. She was 4 years old. That year she had her first of eight surgeries, replacing her vertebrae with titanium rods. Doctors were uncertain about her chances of survival.

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Animals
7:09 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tourists At Kruger National Park Witness High-Speed Chase

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 11:16 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Tourists at South Africa's Kruger National Park witnessed a dramatic high-speed chase - two cheetahs chasing a herd of impala. Impala are African antelope, and of course a Chevy model. And seconds from becoming dinner, one of the impala decided to make a tourist's SUV its getaway car.

Animals
6:17 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Giant Python Snakes His Way Into Thrift Shop

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:13 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

A break-in at an Australian thrift store had police stumped. There was a hole in the ceiling and smashed merchandise. Nothing was missing. Not a burglar, possibly a prankster on a rampage. The next day, staff spotted the intruder still in the store. It was a giant python, 19 feet long, 37 pounds, the head the size of a small dog. The local newspaper reported police chose not to handcuff the culprit, quote, "for logistical reasons."

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