Morning Edition

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Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Around the Nation
6:56 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Long Island Man Legally Changes His Name To Santa Claus

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Long Island man legally changed his name to Santa Claus. Whatever benefits he may get from that, it did not free him from jury duty. Santa Claus was summoned to court. Santa Claus was put on a jury panel. For this defendant, a jury of his peers included the man who showed up wearing a red dress shirt with a picture of Santa Claus and eight reindeer. Santa could have been among those deciding the trial except the case was dismissed. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:50 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Wild Stork Picked Up For Spying In Egypt

A fisherman saw the bird along the Nile River with a suspicious electronic device fixed to its wing. The fisherman made a citizen's arrest. Concerned officials found it was not a spying device, just a wildlife tracker.

Race
4:53 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Paris Has Been A Haven For African Americans Escaping Racism

The City Of Lights became known as a beacon of freedom and tolerance for African Americans. Paris is rich in black history — especially from black Americans who have flocked there since the 19th century.

Remembrances
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

British Journalist Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. We're saying good-bye, this morning, to the man who conducted one of the most famous television interviews in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

DAVID FROST: So what in a sense you're saying, is that there are certain situations where the president can decide that it's in the best interests of the nation or something and do something illegal?

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Well, when the President does it that means it's not illegal.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

In Maine, Even With A GPS, You Can't Get There From Here

If you're planning that last summer road trip, you might want to pull those maps out of the attic.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 10:58 am

Once a standard fixture at every gas station, good old fashioned paper maps have all but folded in the digital age. But, there are places that can baffle your high tech gadgets.

Getting yourself lost in a rural state is an easy thing to do. Pavement turns into dirt track, and before you know it, you're driving through miles of woods and boulders, and your GPS isn't helping.

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