Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6am - 10am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Those Who Serve
3:08 am
Thu July 4, 2013

From Front-Line Soldier To Trainer, An Afghan Odyssey

ANA soldiers plot coordinates on a map with the help of their American trainers.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:55 pm

This report is part of "Those Who Serve," an occasional series that looks at those who wear the military uniform during a time of war.

It's early afternoon at a small outpost in eastern Afghanistan, and U.S. Army Sgt. Chris Cunningham, with the 10th Mountain Division, heads into a long, dusty tent to teach Afghan soldiers the basics of map reading.

After the sun sets, American soldiers help Afghan soldiers outside the wire. They pop artillery shells containing what's called an illumination round.

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It's All Politics
3:07 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Immigration Debate In Congress Riles Up Texas Republicans

Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas delivers remarks during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting to work on the immigration legislation in May.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic shifts that could shake up Texas politics in the coming years — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Within a decade, Hispanics are bound to become the largest ethnic group in Texas. These often Democratic-leaning Texans could reshape the state's GOP-dominated political landscape.

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Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

"Liver buds" grow in petri dishes. The rudimentary organs are about 5 mm wide, or half the height of a classic Lego block.
Courtesy of Takanori Takebe/Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Japanese scientists have cracked open a freaky new chapter in the sci-fi-meets-stem-cells era. A group in Yokohama reported it has grown a primitive liver in a petri dish using a person's skin cells.

The organ isn't complete. It's missing a few parts. And it will be years --maybe decades — before the technique reaches clinics.

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Around the Nation
7:25 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Death Valley Is Hot Tourist Destination, Literally

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 9:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. This summer, Death Valley is a really hot tourist destination. Record-breaking temperatures are drawing crowds of visitors, where they're frying eggs on sidewalks and posing next to a big, unofficial thermometer showing temperatures as high as 132 degrees. Another draw is the aptly named Furnace Creek. Next Wednesday, it will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the hottest recorded temperature on the planet there, 134 degrees. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
7:20 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Short Bar Asks Tall Customer To Stay Away During Busy Hours

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 9:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. I think having a tall one at the bar is a good thing. But a bar owner in Britain disagreed. The owner of the Nutshell Pub asked a customer named Adam Thurkette if he'd mind staying away during busy hours. Adam is 6 foot 7. And the Nutshell is reportedly Britain's smallest pub, 15 feet by 7 feet. The owner says Adam just takes up too much room.

Adam wasn't even offended. He admitted his height is better suited to his work as a tree expert than as a customer in crowded bars.

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