Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6am - 10am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Politics
10:09 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Obama Announces Commerce, Trade Nominees

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with two new cabinet appointments.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This morning, President Obama appointed Penny Pritzker to run the commerce department.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pritzker is an heiress to the Hyatt hotel empire. She also served on the president's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and she is a long time financial backer of the president's political campaigns. Forbes ranks her as one of 300 richest Americans.

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Europe
7:48 am
Thu May 2, 2013

British Charity Tries To Get Kids Outside To Play

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Aiming to get more children to play outdoors, Britain's National Trust created a list of the 50 Things To Do Before You're 11 3/4. Things like climb a tree and cook on a campfire. Enough finished the 50 that the trust used social media to gather more ideas for getting kids away from social media.

Some are quite poetic: Catch a falling leaf. Jump over waves. Hold a scary beast. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:48 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Employees Agree To Wear Company Logo Tattoo

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

How much do you love your employer? Probably not as much as some employees at Rapid Realty in New York. Their boss offered a 15 percent raise to anyone willing to get a tattoo of the company logo, and 40 people took him up on it. We have something similar at NPR. For a marketing campaign, I got a mean MORNING EDITION tat on my forearm. There's a photo of it at our Facebook page. No raise involved. I do feel pretty cool, though that might last as long as the tattoo, which is temporary.

Business
6:59 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Facebook Releases Quarterly Earnings Report

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with profits for Facebook.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Facebook announced its latest quarterly results, reporting revenues just under $1.5 billion.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The company showed a profit of nearly $220 million for the quarter but this fell short of analysts' expectations. CEO Mark Zuckerberg blamed the missed target on higher costs. Company spending is up 60 percent this quarter over the previous one due to hiring and new developments.

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National Security
5:02 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Hunger-Striking Detainees At Guantanamo Are Force-Fed

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 2:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The Guantanamo Bay detention center had more or less faded from the news until this week, when President Obama called it unsustainable. He and others are paying attention now because of an ongoing and growing hunger strike of at least - as of this morning - 100 prisoners. More than 20 are being force fed to keep them alive.

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