Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 6am - 10am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Animals
7:05 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Canadian Police Extricate Bear From Jar

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Winnie the Pooh is often found head-first in a jar of honey. For a bear in Canada, birdseed was too much to resist. Residents in Sudbury, Ontario spotted a bear stumbling down the street, unable to see where it was going, because a large jar of birdseed was stuck on its head. It even bumped into a police car. The cops, you will be happy to know, got experts there to sedate the bear and cut the jar off its head.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Education
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 11:00 am

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Urban Libraries Become De Facto Homeless Shelters

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Whether they like it or not, libraries in some cities serve as homeless shelters. People come off the streets to find quiet and warmth. If libraries want to do something about this, they have some choices: They can put homeless visitors back out on the street. San Francisco libraries want to get them back on their feet.

Scott Shafer reports from member station KQED.

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NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die. The stroke patients also have fewer significant disabilities.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Lee Bollinger, a former president at the University of Michigan, about Tuesday's ruling. Bollinger was president during two earlier landmark affirmative action cases.

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