Arts & More

William Pitts stands across the street from the photo art project "We Are Edison." His portrait is on the old Color Lab building along with many of his neighbors.
Fran Dwight

In Kalamazoo’s Washington Square area, a happy scream emits from a car driving down Portage Street. William Pitts and a friend hurry to park by the old Color Lab building.

“I was just telling my friend that my picture should be up on the wall and stuff. And she was like, ‘For real?’” says Pitts.


Fran Dwight

Imagine living with a disease for years without knowing that you have it. That’s what happened to Kalamazoo singer/songwriter Brian Koenigsknecht


An old photo of Bob Rowe performing for seniors in Calhoun County
courtesy of Bob Rowe

Longtime singer-songwriter Bob Rowe has finished his first folk album in over a decade. It’s called “Higher Ground" and it’s a return to Rowe’s roots after almost 30 years of playing country and gospel - and running his own non-profit. 


Lee Stalsworth, Fine Art through Photography, LLC (Courtesy American Federation of Arts)

In April, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City announced that it would put its Native American art collections in the same wing as other American art. At first, it sounds obvious - of course they would put American art with other American art - but until a few years ago, this was a revolutionary idea. 


Back in the early 1970s, the “Planet of the Apes” films were far more popular with moviegoers than they were with critics. Looking back, it’s not difficult to see why. The original “Planet of the Apes,” starring Charlton Heston, at least had novelty value, a certain kind of eeriness and a satiric edge, qualities that quickly disappeared as Twentieth Century Fox cranked out sequel after sequel. 


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