craft beer

Robbie Feinberg

As the craft beer market gets larger, breweries in Michigan and across the country are growing and expanding their production lines. But that growth comes at a cost. More beer equals more wastewater, and wastewater costs a lot of money to get treated. However, in Michigan, one local brewery has found its own solution.  And one researcher is studying how algae could potentially transform this wastewater into fertilizer, medicine or even fuel.

"GRAND RAPIDS, MI – A lot of people visit Grand Rapids just for its craft beer - to the tune of a $12.23 million economic impact. A recent study commissioned by marketing group Experience Grand Rapids concluded that more than 42,000 beer tourists visit the city annually, spending $7.05 million directly at craft breweries. Of those visitors, more than 13,000 are from outside Michigan. (MLive)

"Michigan-based craft brewers want to change state law so the annual licensing fees they pay can go to benefit research and promotion for their industry rather than support a competing craft beverage sector. Under current law, every dollar that alcohol manufacturers pay in licensing fees to the state is earmarked to fund grape research for Michigan’s wine industry." (MiBiz)


Southwest Michigan's Second Wave Craft Beer Writer Jeremy Martin says Kalamazoo is becoming known for breweries as much as it is for free college and Gibson Guitars. 

Robbie Feinberg

According to experts at the Brewers Association, a craft beer trade group, Michigan’s craft breweries still have a lot more room to grow, both within the state and the country. But the latest step for some brewers is to step into the international market, selling in countries like Italy, Ireland, even Russia and Japan.