Environment

The EPA's current plan for Allied Paper Landfill
courtesy photo

We don’t yet know if Kalamazoo’s Allied Paper Landfill can be cleaned up using microorganisms. The company that wants to do that, BioPath Solutions, is still testing its product. But if BioPath gets the go-ahead from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, it might remove the waste. Many residents have said that’s what they want. But they would also have to deal with some noise and some unpleasant smells.


Michigan Public Radio Network

(MPRN-Lansing) A group of state House Democrats hopes the crisis in Flint will help bring attention to other issues they say threaten clean water in Michigan. They announced bills on Thursday that would increase regulations on fracking. 

Galls hang from blueberry bushes on WMUK correspondent Joan Donaldson's organic blueberry farm
Joan Donaldson

While fruit farmers continue to fight the invasive spotted wing drosophila fly, Southwest Michigan’s blueberry growers also face a homegrown pest. The blueberry gall wasp is native to Michigan but has experienced a population boom in the past few years - and researchers aren’t sure why. 


File photo: Kalamazoo City Commissioner Don Cooney and Kalamazoo residents march to protest capping the Allied Paper Landfill, May 2013.
WMUK

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will decide on the final cleanup plan for the Allied Paper Landfill site soon. But the City of Kalamazoo is still weighing its options. The city has been in talks with BioPath Solutions - a company that breaks down PCB waste with microbes. BioPath says the treatment would cost at least $15 million less than the EPA’s proposed plan. But the question remains - will it work?


MPRN

(MPRN-Undated) A recent ruling could mean lower rates and refunds for Michigan energy customers. 

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