farming

"LANSING, MI - A story dated June 20 alleging that Michigan residents"lost their 'right to farm" this week thanks to a new ruling by the Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development" is as untrue today as it was two years ago, the fact-checking Snopes.com reported Wednesday." (MLive/Kalamazoo Gazette)

Robbie Feinberg/WMUK

Michigan’s new minimum wage law that passed in 2014 has left a lot of workers with more money in their pockets. It boosted the state minimum wage from $7.40 per hour up to the current rate of $8.50. By 2018, it’ll be up to $9.25. But the legislation also wiped away the amendments and rules that went along with the state’s old minimum wage law. Because of that, labor advocates are worried that a segment of Michigan’s farmworkers are now exempt from minimum wage laws. 


River North Photography / iStrock Photo

Urban agriculture can be done in many places, and by people of different ages and with different interests. That’s according to Kami Pothukuchi, a Wayne State University Professor and the director of SEED Wayne. 


"LANSING, MI — The debate over Great Lakes fish farming is picking up speed in Lansing, where two hearings are scheduled this week on competing Republican bills that would expand or outright ban commercial net-pen aquaculture in Michigan waters." (MLive)

A wind machine on a Fennville farm
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The west shoreline of Lake Michigan is known as a windy location, because as air masses travel across the Lake’s open water, there are no structures or forests to create friction that would slow its movement. Yet, like the ancient symbols for theater showing smiling or weeping faces, wind can either work in a farmer’s favor or cause financial losses. 


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