farming

River North Photography / iStrock Photo

Urban agriculture can be done in many places, and by people of different ages and with different interests. That’s according to Kami Pothukuchi, a Wayne State University Professor and the director of SEED Wayne. 


"LANSING, MI — The debate over Great Lakes fish farming is picking up speed in Lansing, where two hearings are scheduled this week on competing Republican bills that would expand or outright ban commercial net-pen aquaculture in Michigan waters." (MLive)

A wind machine on a Fennville farm
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The west shoreline of Lake Michigan is known as a windy location, because as air masses travel across the Lake’s open water, there are no structures or forests to create friction that would slow its movement. Yet, like the ancient symbols for theater showing smiling or weeping faces, wind can either work in a farmer’s favor or cause financial losses. 


John Van Voorhees picks chestnuts off of the taller branches
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Even though I grew up in a mid-size town, on Sunday afternoons my family often drove into the surrounding countryside, where we would buy a gallon of cider from a fruit stand, and then troll the back roads for hickory nut trees. 


Farmer Arturo Pendoja talking with Kyle Mead, ground water technician with the Van Buren Conservation District
Robbie Feinberg, WMUK

This week, we’ve been looking at the changing lives of Hispanic workers in Michigan’s fields. Many are leaving the fields entirely. But others are stepping into a new agricultural role: farm owner. From 2007 to 2012, the number of Hispanic farmers in Michigan has increased by nearly 10 percent. For years, they've faced discrimination and cultural barriers. But now, one man in Southwest Michigan is trying to bring them together.


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