film

Film engineer Johanna Kelly preps some trailer film at WMU's Little Theatre
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Starting January first, the film industry will stop making movies on the old 35 millimeter reels—which means movie theaters all over the country have until that date to switch to digital projectors. But it hasn’t been easy for small theaters—the new technology starts at about $50,000. Despite the cost, theaters in Southwest Michigan are trying to make it work.

One of the great perks of being a film critic is being able to call attention to terrific movies that most people will never hear about. These are the pictures that aren't advertised every ten minutes on TV or hyped to the heavens a full year before they're going to be in theaters. An excellent example would be The Spectacular Now, director James Ponsoldt's outstanding adaptation of the popular novel by Tim Tharp.

There are many strange and puzzling films you may encounter over the course of your lifetime. But I feel reasonably safe in saying that you will never find anything quite so flamboyantly bizarre as the 1977 Japanese horror-comedy-musical-psychodrama Hausu, or House, a movie that exists in its own stratosphere of wackiness. 

Searching for Sugar Man Facebook page

The fantastical story of how Detroit-based folk musician Sixto Rodriguez, unknown in the U.S., suddenly found himself a big sensation overseas is the subject of the Academy Award-winning documentary Searching for Sugar Man which will be shown Wednesday at Western Michigan University.

Four words that can strike terror into your heart when your partner says them: "We need to talk." It's almost always the start of something unpleasant. But when it's Jesse and Celine doing the chatting, the result is usually irresistible.

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