Helen Keller

Arts & More
4:20 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

"The Miracle Worker" Is A Timeless Classic Of Teaching Others And Overcoming Obstacles

Photograph of Helen Keller at age 8 with her tutor Anne Sullivan on vacation in Brewster, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Sullivan moved in with the Kellers in 1887, and began a teacher-pupil relationship that would last five decades.
Credit New England Historical Society

Before she was known as an author, a humanitarian, a champion for women's rights, and advocate for the deaf and blind, Helen Keller was a bit of a tyrant.

She lost her vision and hearing she was two. This left her parents unable to effectively communicate with her and handle her constant outbursts. Following tip of telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell, the Kellers visited the Perkins Institute of the Blind, where they found Anne Sullivan.  

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