invasive species

AP Photo/Jeff Barnard

The Chinook salmon or King salmon - a favorite of anglers on Lake Michigan - is in decline. That’s because it’s starving. According to a study by Michigan State University, the population of the salmon’s only prey - a small invasive fish called the alewife - has dropped by more than half since 2002. 

Ironically, other invasives - zebra and quagga mussels - are eating the alewives’ food.


WMUK

(MPRN-Detroit) Michigan and the Canadian province of Ontario are negotiating a strategy for improving and managing waterways. Governor Rick Snyder and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne met in Detroit to announce the beginnings of the joint plan. 

Japanese knotweed pushing up through concrete on South Westnedge Avenue in Kalamazoo.
Hannah Hudson

As invasive species continue to pop up in Michigan, the state is organizing to fight them. With the help of a $3.6 million grant, Michigan has created regional programs to battle invasive species. They’re called CISMAs or Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas. They aim to find and treat invasives, but they can’t do it alone. State environmental stewards need everyday people to help stop the spread of invasive species. 


'WASHINGTON — Nearly two years after the release of a landmark report on alternatives for keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes, federal officials told members of Congress on Wednesday it could be another four years before recommendations for stopping the invasive species at a key chokepoint outside Chicago are ready. " (Detroit Free Press)

"WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow on Sunday urged the Obama administration to take “immediate action” to respond to the threat of Asian carp after U.S. Fish and Wildlife said the species has been found 12 miles nearer to Lake Michigan." (Detroit Free Press)

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