Michigan film incentives

Last summer, Governor Rick Snyder announced that Michigan would no longer offer film incentives. Since then very few big box office hits have found their way to the mitten. But last week the Michigan Film Office announced that Paramount Pictures would film Transformers 5 in Detroit. 

Actress Mila Kunis arrives at the European premiere of Oz: The Great And Powerful at a central London cinema, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013.
Joel Ryan/Invision/AP Images

Last week, Michigan officials announced that the movie “Looking for Alaska,” based on the novel by John Green, was going to be filmed in both Southeast and Western Michigan this fall. It’s an exciting announcement, but it also comes at a tough time for the Michigan Film Office. Just a month ago, the state legislature voted to get rid of the state's film incentives. Michigan Film Office Director Jenell Leonard says that while "Looking for Alaska" was one of the last films to get the incentives, the office has a new, more digital-focused plan for the future.


Actress Mila Kunis arrives at the European premiere of Oz: The Great And Powerful at a central London cinema, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013.
Joel Ryan/Invision/AP Images

It looks like Michigan will likely join only a handful of states that do not offer incentives for filmmakers. A bill to eliminate the state’s film office is awaiting Governor Rick Snyder’s signature. 

MPRN

(MPRN-Lansing) Budget talks are wrapping up at the state Capitol. As part of the discussion, lawmakers are looking to cut Michigan’s $50 million film incentive program in half. 

It turns out that Hollywood, like most other industries, doesn’t like uncertainty. While a recent vote by the Michigan House of Representatives to cut funding for the state’s film incentives program may lack the traction to pass in the Senate and get a signature from the governor, industry experts believe the vote could further chill studios’ desire to do business in the state. (MiBiz)

Pages