Michigan road funding

Mike Lanka / WMU University Relations

A final push to convince voters to support a ballot proposal for road funding brought Governor Rick Snyder to Kalamazoo on Friday. 

LANSING -- It's too complicated. Taxes are already too high. State government can't be trusted to spend the money properly. Those are the sentiments that appear to be dooming the Proposal 1 sales tax and road funding initiative. With the special election only five days away, some 61% of likely voters say they plan to vote no on the complex proposal, according to an exclusive new Free Press-WXYZ-TV (Channel 7) poll. (Detroit Free Press)

Paul Wilk says he doesn't get passionate about much, but higher taxes and Proposal 1 rev him up. The 58-year-old Allen Park resident is so determined to defeat the measure that would raise the sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent that he has for months been leaving glossy Vote No placards on doorsteps — and occasionally engaging likely voters. (Detroit News)

Lansing – — Supporters of Proposal 1 plan to launch a three-day, nine-city bus tour Thursday in a last-ditch effort to convince voters to approve a nearly 17 percent increase in the state sales tax rate. With one week until the special statewide election next Tuesday, the Safe Roads Yes ballot campaign is deploying teams of volunteers to call voters and track down unreturned absentee ballots over the proposed constitutional amendment linked to boosting road funding $1.2 billion annually. The campaign wouldn't divulge who will be on the bus. (Detroit News)

LANSING – An elections expert is projecting that 1.5 million Michigan voters will turn out for the May 5 road funding special election on Proposal 1. That's less than the 2.4 million in Michigan who voted in the Proposal A special election of 1994, but higher than some analysts have predicted. (Detroit Free Press)

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