Palisades Nuclear Power Plant

Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

An anti-nuclear activist says Palisades Nuclear Power Plant will still be a concern even after it’s closed. Chris Williams advocated for the shutdown of another Entergy-owned plant - Vermont Yankee. Williams addressed South Haven residents and activists at a talk Thursday night at Lake Michigan College. 

A poster hanging in the main entrance to the Covert Public Schools building
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Closing the Palisades Nuclear Power Plant in Covert Township means finding a place for spent nuclear fuel and determining where power currently generated by the plant will come from.


In this April 13, 2006, file photo, Pete Vavricka conducts an underground train from the entrance of Yucca Mountain in Nevada.
Isaac Breekken, AP Images

If Palisades Nuclear Power Plant shuts down next year, where will the nuclear waste go? The short answer is probably nowhere. 


A photo from the 1999 demolition of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. It was part of the decommissioning of the former nuclear power plant.
Jackie Johnston/AP Images

If you get your power from Consumers Energy, you’ve likely been putting money into a savings account for Palisades Nuclear Power Plant for years. Consumers charges rate-payers a small fee that goes into what’s called a decommissioning trust fund. That money will be used to clean up radioactive contamination at the site once Palisades shuts down. Right now there’s more than $400 million in the trust fund, but environmentalists worry it won’t be enough. 


8th graders work on a math assignment at Covert Public Schools
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Palisades Nuclear Power Plant is expected to close next year. That means more than 600 people will lose their jobs. That could also spell bad news for Van Buren County. The county gets almost $10 million in property taxes from Palisades every year.


Pages