racism

Kalamazoo Community Foundation

Kalamazoo is among communities participating in the second annual National Day of Racial Healing on Tuesday, Jan. 16th. The city has recognized the day with a proclamation, says Lanna Lewis of the Kalamazoo Community Foundation, who is a guest today on WMUK's WestSouthwest (listen now, below). 

The day has local roots. Battle Creek-based W.K. Kellogg Foundation started it last year to focus the country's attention on combating structural racism as it launched its new Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation long-term initiative in 14 cities, including Kalamazoo.


WMU University Relations

The city of Kalamazoo is hosting its 16th annual day of service for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday. 

WMUK

Historian and author Danille McGuire says the story of Shawana Hall is the story of how marginalized women disappear from stories of sexual assault. She says the #MeToo movement is largely about rich white women. McGuire says she and Wayne State University History Professor Kidada Williams wanted to remind people that are many women like Shawana Hall whose cases don’t get solved, and whose stories are not known.


Courtesy photo | Southern Poverty Law Center

If it seems like hate is increasing, it is. So says the Southern Poverty Law Center that has been monitoring domestic hate for nearly half a century.

Within 10 days of November's presidential election, about 850 incidences of hate and racial intimidation were reported to the center, says outreach director Lecia Brooks.

It rose to over 1,800 by March of this year. Brooks headlines the Kalamazoo Summit on Racism on Nov. 17 in Kalamazoo.


Courtesy photo

None of Dr. David Ansell's patients who needed a transplant ever got one in his 27 years at two of Chicago's safety-net hospitals, yet the patients from the trauma units there, many of them black, he says, provided the organs for the procedures at the wealthier hospitals. Why? 

Ansell says the poorer hospitals had no transplant specialists on staff and, even if a referral were to be made, either the specialist didn't accept that type of insurance or the patient was uninsured.

It's these and other inequities that's leading to wide disparities in the health between white and brown people in the U.S., says Ansell, who speaks in Kalamazoo on June 6. 


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