science

WMUK News
3:05 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

You Can Help Undergraduate Research at WMU

WMU senior Deirdre Courtney in the field with bug-eating pitcher plants.
Credit Western Michigan University

Graduate students are expected to do research. Undergraduates usually don’t. But a new project at Western Michigan University’s Department of Biological Sciences hopes to change that. It’s using a fundraising system modeled on Kickstarter to attract community support for SABRE: "Students Advancing Biological Research and Engagement."

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Citizen Scientists
7:22 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

WSW: Encore Magazine Profiles Citizen Scientists

Lindsey Parkinson, an intern at the Kalamazoo Nature Center, releases a blue jay, after it was banded last fall
Credit Encore Magazine/Erik Holladay

WestSouthwest with Tiffany Fitzgerald

Writer Tiffany Fitzgerald examined some of the work being done by "citizen scientists" in Southwest Michigan. 

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Monarch Butterflies
8:15 am
Wed February 26, 2014

WSW: The Path of the Monarch Butterfly

Cluster of monarch butterflies in Santa Cruz, California
Credit Brocken Inaglory, Wikicommons

WestSouthwest with Stephen Malcolm

Western Michigan University Biological Sciences Professor Stephen Malcolm says the population of the monarch butterfly in North America has dropped over the last 20 years. 

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Station News
1:21 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

Earth/Sky leaving radio

The popular science module Earth/Sky will be going out of production at the end of May.  WMUK will air the final weekday broadcast of the 2-minute program on May 31.  The program has been heard on WMUK right before NPR's All Things Considered for several years. 

After two decades of broadcasts to stations across the country program producers in Austin, Texas, have decided to focus their efforts and resources on their website: earthsky.org.

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1:43 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

Get ready for Comet PANSTARRS

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo Valley Museum Planetarium Coordinator Eric Schreur says a good place to look on March 12th is just to the left of the crescent moon. A pair of binoculars will help.
After spending a few months in the skies of Earth's southern hemisphere, the comet will be visible in the northern hemisphere around dusk, low in the western sky, starting tonight through March 13, according to comet experts. Comet-watchers will need clear skies to see the celestial body, experts say.

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