west nile virus

Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

A hot and dry summer may mean fewer mosquitos. But a Michigan State University Entomology Professor says that the mosquitos that are found may pose a greater threat of carrying the West Nile Virus. 


The Southwest Michigan Mosquito Squad sprays down the back yard of a homeowner on Kalamazoo's east side
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The wetter the summer, the more mosquitos you’re likely to find outside. In hot, dry summers like this there are fewer mosquitoes, but the ones there are are a greater threat. That’s because West Nile virus spreads more easily in warm weather. This summer Michigan State University has predicted an outbreak of West Nile in Michigan.   


"GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Kent County Health Department officials have detected West Nile virus in a sampling of mosquitoes. It is not a human case." (MLive)

Patient has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home

Two people in Michigan died in 2013 after being infected by West Nile Virus

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