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Gordon Evans / WMUK

Bill Cobbs’ background includes working as an executive at Xerox and a stint in the Navy to help pay for getting his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan. He also worked as a police officer while attending Wayne State University Law School. Now he’s running for governor because he says it’s time to “get Michigan back on track.” But Cobbs will be running as a write-in candidate.


Courtesy photo

Grand Rapids native Dann Sytsma has long wondered why it's customary for companies to offer new employee orientation, but not so for communities to provide such training for its new residents. That question has led him to launch the "Welcome to Kalamazoo" show during downtown Kalamazoo's Art Hops. The next one is May 4.


Western Michigan University libraries

In 1915, just fifty years after the end of slavery in the United States, a group of states convened a fair in Chicago they called the Lincoln Jubilee. The weeks-long event celebrated African-Americans’ achievements since the signing of the Thirteenth Amendment. Michigan’s delegation wrote a book for the occasion, and one historian says it belongs on everyone’s reading list.


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The word "literary" doesn't usually come to mind when thinking about U.S. presidents. But the nation's 26th president most definitely was a "literary man." So argue Western Michigan University professors Thomas Bailey and Katherine Joslin in their new book, Theodore Roosevelt: A Literary Life (University Press of New England, 2018).


WMUK

Tim Bartik says incentives used by state and local governments to lure companies or encourage them to expand are not free. The Senior Economist at the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research says it’s important to find out if the benefit of those incentives is worth the cost.


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