WMU

Kathy Willens / AP Photo

Actor Scott Turner Schofield says we live in a society that's in transition when it comes to different ways to express gender. The traditional, binary, male-female paradigm doesn't work for everyone. Schofield will take about the issue during this year's "Respecting Differences" event in Kalamazoo on Wednesday, April 12.


Bonica Ayala

With WMU's Spring Choral Showcase on Saturday, and the Grammy-winning Roomful of Teeth performing Sunday, Kim Adams says it will be an exceptional weekend for lovers of vocal music. The director of choral activities at Western Michigan University previews both concerts with Cara Lieurance.


Dennis Jarvis, via Flickr creative commons

Cristobal Pineda Flores, the head of the percussion program at the national School of Music in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, is the featured guest artist on a concert by the Western Michigan University Percussion Ensemble on Wednesday night. An expert on the musical traditions of Mayan descendants and Garifuna music, he and the WMU percussion students will perform music of these cultures, as well as a variety of modern pieces by American composers.   Pineda and WMU professor of percussion Judy Moonert,  along with student Austin Mortiere, join Cara Lieurance for a preview.


Here Comes Treble practicing in one member's kitchen. There are 13 women in the group.
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Men in striped suits and straw hats, singing romantic, old-timey lyrics. This is a traditional barbershop quartet - what a Capella singing used to be like. A Capella has come to mean “without instrumentation," though it originally meant "choral style" in Italian.

It was a style that became popular in the 1930s and 40s. Though it’s gone through its ups and downs, a Capella is back in vogue today - more than 80 years later. 


Art student Aoi Fukuyama (right) collects a sample onto a SPME fiber. Also pictured are music student Tony Mitchell (far left) and chemistry students Emily Passmore (middle left) and Taylor Grace (middle right).
Andre Venter

Can you turn science into art? For the past few months, Western Michigan University students have been doing just that. They’ve taken chemical data from drinks like coffee, tea, and beer and translated it into music compositions and visual art. 


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