WMUK News

Local news produced by our reporters here at WMUK

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Kalamazoo County has postponed a decision on whether to pursue a countywide ID program. That’s so the task force that’s been studying the idea has time to do more research on how the program would work.

Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Also, commissioners have passed a resolution in favor of a phone surcharge to fund consolidated 9-1-1 dispatch.

The Kalamazoo City Commission has decisions to make about how to spend $10 million. The money comes from the $70 million that private donors gave to the city to shore up the budget for three years and fund a steep cut in property taxes. The city plans to use $10 million of the money each year for "aspirational projects for youth development and poverty reduction, investments in capital and human infrastructure, and neighborhood improvement projects" according to the city's website.

Commissioners will meet March 27 at 6pm to talk about generational poverty and how the funds could be used to fight it.

Cleon Ludwick installs the new energy-efficient lights in Western Michigan University's Friedmann Hall. If you look closely, you can see how blue the new lights look compared to the more yellow lights down the hall
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

We’ve been lucky this season, but Michigan winters are usually known for a lack of sunshine. For some people that can trigger seasonal depression. Western Michigan University has been moving to more energy-efficient light bulbs - with hope that the lights might have the added bonus of boosting the moods of students and staff. 


Sehvilla Mann / WMUK

Religious leaders in Kalamazoo say they’ll do what they can to protect undocumented immigrants from deportation, including sheltering them at their churches.

Pastor Nathan Dannison of First Congregational Church in Kalamazoo says some churches in Kalamazoo will let people stay there if they fear being caught in a raid. He says a number of congregations can also connect people with legal services and provide child care, services Dannison said more people were likely to need.

In this April 13, 2006, file photo, Pete Vavricka conducts an underground train from the entrance of Yucca Mountain in Nevada.
Isaac Breekken, AP Images

If Palisades Nuclear Power Plant shuts down next year, where will the nuclear waste go? The short answer is probably nowhere. 


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