women's history

Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

The first Women’s Rights Convention was held in New York in 1848, but women wouldn’t win the right to vote until 70 years later.

“Many people think that this began sometime in the 1900s and oh maybe after 10 or 15 years they got it done. That wasn’t the case," says Lin Cote, vice president of the Ladies Library Association in Kalamazoo.


Gene Herrick, The Associated Press / AP

The Executive Director of the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College says in the history of the civil rights movement women have become symbols, rather than recognized for their work. Mia Henry says many women made valuable contributions in the fight for civil rights. 


Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

Our final WestSouthwest of 2016 is an extended version of an interview from earlier this year on the history of women's suffrage in the United States.


Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons

University of Notre Dame Political Science Professor Christina Wolbrecht says a lot is known about the movement to get women the right to vote, but she says how women used the right to vote hasn’t received nearly as much study. 


Courtesy Abigail Southworth

Nearly every part of Abigail Southworth’s life is devoted to art. She teaches it at Kalamazoo Valley Community College's Center for New Media. She designs logos and brochures for organizations like Kellogg and the United Way. But at night, Southworth leaves behind the work and designs her own, very personal art, touching on topics like sexual orientation and mental illness. In her latest exhibit, "Superheroines," Southworth chooses to highlight several women who inspire her -- women who history has forgotten or overlooked.