Arts & More

Arts & More airs Fridays at 7:50 a.m., 11:55 a.m., and 4:20 p.m.

Theme music: "Like A Beginner Again" by Dan Barry of Seas of Jupiter

Sarah Schudel in the game room at her parent's home in Kalamazoo - the site of this year's state championships for pinball.
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Few kids grow up with a pinball machine, but Sarah Schudel had a game room full of them. Her childhood home has 47 pinball machines. Schudel is ranked 7th in the state and 8th in the world for women.

On Saturday, February 11th, she’ll be one of 16 Michiganders competing in this year’s Michigan Pinball Championship put on by the International Flipper Pinball Association


Author, founder of the black newspaper 'The Voice of the Fugitive,' and former slave, Henry Bibb.
Wikimedia Commons

It’s safe to say that a fist fight changed Kalamazoo playwright Von Washington Sr.’s life. While stationed in Montana with the U.S. Air Force, Washington says he got into a scuffle with a man on the street. When the police arrived, the man lied and said that Washington had a weapon - an offense that could have put him in prison. 


Tanisha Pyron Photography

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1967 riots in Detroit - considered to be the largest civil disturbance in the United States of the 20th century. Over five days, people took to the streets protesting police brutality against African Americans and segregation. 


Brandy Joe Plambeck

Emilio Rodriguez is this year’s guest of honor at the annual Theatre Kalamazoo New Play Festival, February 3rd and 4th at the Judy K. Jolliffe Theatre (formerly known as the Epic Center Theatre). He’s known for telling lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender stories - especially from the perspective of people of color. 


Dr. Jacqueline Eng analyzes bones of Kyang Cave, Nar-Phu Valley, Nepal.
Liesel Clark

This month, a Western Michigan University bio-anthropologist was featured on the PBS show NOVA, in an episode called “Secrets of the Sky Tombs.” Jacqueline Eng studies ancient cliff-side tombs in Nepal. By looking at the bones and teeth, Eng and other anthropologists are trying to find out more about the health and cultural heritage of the people buried there. 

  

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