WestSouthwest

Interviews with news makers and discussion of topics important to Southwest Michigan. Heard Monday and Thursday mornings at 9:30. With an afternoon rebroadcast both days at 3:30

Western Michigan University libraries

In 1915, just fifty years after the end of slavery in the United States, a group of states convened a fair in Chicago they called the Lincoln Jubilee. The weeks-long event celebrated African-Americans’ achievements since the signing of the Thirteenth Amendment. Michigan’s delegation wrote a book for the occasion, and one historian says it belongs on everyone’s reading list.


AP Photo

The word "literary" doesn't usually come to mind when thinking about U.S. presidents. But the nation's 26th president most definitely was a "literary man." So argue Western Michigan University professors Thomas Bailey and Katherine Joslin in their new book, Theodore Roosevelt: A Literary Life (University Press of New England, 2018).


WMUK

Tim Bartik says incentives used by state and local governments to lure companies or encourage them to expand are not free. The Senior Economist at the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research says it’s important to find out if the benefit of those incentives is worth the cost.


Alison Dunlap / University of Pennsylvania Museum

What came first at the dawn of human civilization: bread or beer? Patrick McGovern is betting on beer. The archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia studies the deep history of fermented alcoholic beverages, and has helped recreate several of them. McGovern speaks about his adventures in "paleo-brewing" at Western Michigan University on Thursday, April 12.


Wikimedia Commons / U.S. Geological Survey

Western Michigan University Political Science Professor Susan Hoffman says public housing has a reputation problem. But she says it’s still an important tool for providing housing for low-income people.


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